Scientific Program

Day 1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Future of ultrasound wound therapy: Technologies, devices, science and clinical outcomes

    Arobella Medical, LLC
    USA
    Biography

    Eliaz P. Babaev, Ph.D., Co-Founded Arobella Medical, LLC in 2006 and serves as its Chief Executive Officer and President. Dr. Babaev Co-founded Celleration Inc. and served as its Chief Technical Officer until July 2009 and Chief Executive Officer. Dr. Babaev worked as an ultrasound system design engineer and research scientist for DiaSorin, Inc., SpectRx, and AeroPag-USA, Inc. He served as the Head of Biomedical Engineering Laboratory and a Professor for State Technical University, Baku, USSR for 25 years. Dr. Babaev then immigrated to the U.S. in 1994 and worked as a senior technical consultant for several medical device companies. He served as Assistant Professor in the Biomedical Engineering Department of Bauman Moscow State Technical University. He has also been a Research Fellow in Biomechanics and Bioengineering at the Warsaw University of Technology and Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. Dr. Babaev graduated from Moscow-Bauman Technical University with a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering and Biomechanical Engineering in 1975. Dr. Babaev holds D.Sc. (Doctor of Science), Biomedical Engineering (Medical Ultrasound) in 1993 and D.Sc., Biomedical Instrumentations and Biomechanics from Latvian Academy of Science, Center For Biomechanics & Biomedical Engineering Riga, Latvia in 1991. He received B.S. and M.S. Degree in Mechanical Engineering (Industrial Ultrasound - NDT for Oil Reservoirs) in Azerbaijan Technical University Baku, Azerbaijan in 1969. Dr. Babaev has more than 40+ years expertise in Non-Imaging Medical Ultrasound and particularly in Ultrasound Wound Management, live tissue repair and in all the areas of advances in skin, wound care, nursing, tissue science, drug delivery systems, wound treatment technologies, tissue engineering, and body architectonics research and cancer research including apoptosis. 50+ US and 100+ Worldwide Patents are issued, numerous are pending, 50+ scientific articles, abstracts are published.

    Abstract

    Nowadays, ultrasonic wound and skin treatments, especially those which aid in infection control, have been gaining the interest of hospitals, clinics, wound care centers and doctors’ offices worldwide. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce upcoming advances in ultrasonic wound therapy, as well as to share, review and evaluate the expected efficacy of ultrasound therapies in treating all types of acute and chronic wounds. This includes battlefield wound treatment and the topical oxygenation of wounds and body parts with ultrasound. For wound treatment purposes, both low and high frequency ultrasound devices will used in the near future. For example, Arobella Medical has designed: 1. (Patented and FDA approved) The Qoustic Panacea® AS-1000 is the next wound care product based on the use of ultrasonic energy to mix oxygen and saline in real-time. This allows for ultrasound delivery to the wound bed and topical oxygenation of various parts of the body. Slides and videos will be demonstrated during presentation. 2. Portable Wound Therapy System AF 1000 series to provide a portable ultrasound device for the treatment of wounds. This system is suitable for military use in the battlefield for immediate treatment of wounded soldiers. Additionally, the device’s small size, portability, and low weight enable its use in field surgery, where equipment is often limited. The device cauterizes the wound, stops bleeding, greatly reduces pain, and prevents infection. The Portable Wound therapy system has several therapeutic effects and can remove bullets or shrapnel from a wound, making it useful in battlefields, terrorist attacks and other disaster areas, such as crashes, etc. This device can be used by a variety of emergency personnel whether in an ambulance or an antiterrorism operation. Slides and videos will be demonstrated during presentation. 3. BA-1000 Skin Care Device and Method: The BA-1000 is an ultrasound assisted, cryogenic ablation device that enables tissue to be frozen and ablated at zero degrees Celsius. Generally, tissue ablation is performed at negative fifty degrees Celsius. This device is going to be used for warts, skin disorders (scars), Human papillomavirus and later for tumor removal with reduced discoloration, less scarring, minimal regrowth, faster healing and less pain in comparison with existing technologies such a laser, cryo, etc. Ablating tissue at a warmer temperature, the exact freezing point of water, limits damage to surrounding tissue and provides a safer procedure. 4. Osteomyelitis Treatment: Osteomyelitis is an infection of bone marrow. Standard treatment involves surgically opening the bone and scraping away infected marrow. Arobella Medical has developed a technology that enables a significantly less invasive treatment of the disease. This device is protected by issued US patents. 5. Arobella Medical has developed ultrasound technology for use in combination with varying degrees of pressure and/or suction (Negative Pressure Wound Therapy + ultrasound and Positive Pressure Wound Therapy + ultrasound) as an all-in-one device for accelerating tissue healing in patients. The use of ultrasound by medical personnel for wound treatment provides benefits of improved efficiency, faster healing, selective debridement and less pain during and after the procedure. 6. Different companies including Arobella Medical are working on high frequency ultrasound devices for wound therapy. 7. Ultrasonic Infection Control: A patented hand washing or sterilization device for use before surgery in operating rooms. Other applications include kitchens, stores, toilets, and public areas. During the presentation many other expected future ultrasound technologies and devices will be discussed.

  • The rise in antibiotic resistance; contributing factors and possible solutions

    Grinnel College
    USA
    Biography

    Shannon Hinsa Leasure is an associate professor of biology and an environmental microbiologist at Grinnell College in Iowa. Her research interests include microbial diversity, antibiotic resistance and genetic exchange, as well as bacterial adaptations to varied environments. Most recently she has investigated the ability of copper alloy materials to reduce bacterial loads in hospitals and fitness centers. Additionally, she is studying antibiotic resistance gene profiles on farms, in collaboration with researchers at Iowa State University and the Agricultural Research Service at the USA. Department of Agriculture. As time permits, she continues her study of microbial diversity and biofilm formation in Siberian permafrost. At Grinnell, she teaches courses in microbiology, environmental microbiology, cell biology and microbial pathogenesis. She also maintains an active laboratory with undergraduate students. She earned her B.S. in bacteriology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her Ph.D. from Dartmouth Medical School in molecular and cellular biology.

    Abstract

    I would highlight my work on hog confinements, hospitals and the athletic center in a talk titled “The rise in antibiotic resistance; contributing factors and possible solutions”. The lecture would begin with an introduction to the current state of antibiotic resistance and its implications on human health and health care. I will explore reasons for the increased resistance, specifically the use of antibiotics in animal agriculture. I will discuss my recent work to monitor antibiotic resistance genes in hog manure, agriculture soils and sediments. The second half of the talk will examine possible ways to combat the spread of antibiotic resistance in hospitals and community centers. To reduce the risk of hospital-acquired infections, we need to limit the number of bacteria surrounding patients. I will share our recent studies in which we compared the bacterial loads on high touch surfaces made of either copper alloys or conventional materials such as stainless steel or porcelain. This study was conducted at Grinnell Regional Medial Center, a 49-bed rural hospital, primarily in medical-surgical suite rooms with a few items throughout the hospital. Surfaces were sampled in both occupied and unoccupied patient rooms. We found that copper alloy surfaces significantly reduced the bacterial loads by an average of 98% compared to control surfaces. We found no significant difference in bacterial loads between control occupied and unoccupied rooms; suggesting that although a room may look clean, it does not guarantee the surfaces are free of bacteria. This study demonstrated that patients entering rooms with high touch copper alloy surfaces are exposed to substantially fewer bacteria than patients entering rooms with standard surfaces. It also highlighted the ability of copper alloy surfaces to maintain bacterial loads at or near cleanliness standards following terminal cleaning of the hospital room. We expanded this work to our athletic center, a community site in which antibiotic resistant bacteria are commonly shared. This is the first study of copper alloys in an athletic center setting and we found a 94% reduction in bacterial counts by these surfaces. We also identified the most common bacteria found on copper and control surfaces and tested their sensitivity to antibiotics. Both the hospital and athletic center studies were published in the American Journal of Infection Control.

  • Prevention of pressure ulcer: When, where, who and why start with prevention of pressure ulcer

    Association of Wound Management
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Biography

    Jasmina Begic is a Medical Consultant for BIOPTRON, Zepter Internastional for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Founder of Association for Wound management in B&H, Founder and author of Euro-Asian Forum, one of founder of www.BALWMA.org. She is currently working as a Dermatovenerologyst in Bioptron International team-Wound Healing and also a certified VCC trainer of elderly care; certified VCC trainer of manager EU founds; certified practitioner of TCM; certified practitioner of herbal medicine. She finished her graduation and post-graduation studies at Medical School of University Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and completed her PhD in the field of Tissue Regeneration and Wound Healing from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur. She did volunteer works in Association for Wound management in Bosnia and Herzegovina (AWMinB&H) from 2008 till present. She is also active member in UEMS TF WH, EWMA, EADV. Her projects are involved in Clinical Research “Appliance Bioptron polarized light (480 -3400nm) in the therapy of dermatosis: Acne vulgaris and Ulcer cruris” which is approved by members of Scientifically Research Institute of Clinical Center of University in Sarajevo and Members of Ethics Commitee of Clinical Center University in Sarajevo; Euro-Asian Forum of Association for Wound Management (2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018); Academy for health and social occupation (2013); Implementation of Traditional Chinese Medicine in health and stationary institution in Bosnia and Herzegovina and country of Western Balkan (2014); Balkan Wound Management Association (2015); Integrative Medicine in Postoperative Management (2017); Integrative medicine: Prevention is best cure of Pressure Ulcers (2017).

    Abstract

    Introduction: Seventeen percent of hospitalized patients have or will end up having a PU. In the worldwide geriatric population, 71% of patients ?70 years have PU. Pressure ulcers (PU) is skin breakdown and continuum of tissue damage localized injury to the skin. Intrinsic factors: Immobilization, cognitive deficit, chronic illness (eg, diabetes mellitus) poor nutrition, use of steroids, aging. Extrinsic factors (pressure, friction, humidit, shearforce). Characteristics: Pain, infectious complications, prolonged and expensive hospitalizations, persistent open ulcers. Treatments: Why? Increased risk of the death. Associated with the development of pressure ulcers. HOW? PREVENTIONS. WHERE? Intensive care unit (ICU). Postoperative care begins immediately after surgery. Includes pain management and wound care!!! My choice is: INTEGRATIVE HEALTH & MEDICINE Integrative Medicine is the Medicine of the Future (concludes of International Congress (ICIHM) in Stuttgart, 2016).

Scientific Sessions: Wound Healing & Tissue Repair | Wounds & Ulcers | Wound Care & Lymphedema | Wound Care Treatment & Therapies | Skin & Skin Cancer | Molecular Microbiology
Chair
Co-Chair
Speaker
  • Plenary Speaker
    The use of amniotic membrane in healing excisional debridement of sea urchin stings
    Time: 12:00-12:30
    Speaker
    Clifton Peele
    University Hospitals Richmond Medical Center
    USA
    Biography

    Clifton Peele is a native of Eastern North Carolina, where he earned his Bachelor of Science Degree from East Carolina University. After which he earned his doctorate in podiatric medicine from the renowned Des Moines University in Des Moines, Iowa. Advancing his training as a preceptor at One Foot Two Foot Clinic in Suffolk, VA. He completed his medical and surgical training at the prestigious Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C. He was fortunate to be accepted to a two year fellowship in wound care and diabetic limb salvage at University Hospital in Cleveland, OH. Currently, he is a podiatrist at Total Foot Care Clinic in Hattiesburg, MS.

    Abstract

    Sea urchin stings have plagued many people and most commonly affect the feet. Many physicians in literature have described treatments for these traumas. The various treatment options for sea urchin stings range from soaking the feet in vinegar to help detach the barbs, to antibiotic therapy with narcotics for pain control. However, in an extensive review of literature, Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane has not yet been used to treat sea urchin stings. Allografts have been used to treat every type of traumatic condition and chronic foot ulcers that affect every type of population. Now Allografts such as Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane have found a new usefulness in the treatment of Sea Urchin stings. The Dehydrated Human Amnion/Chorion Membrane can reduce the scar tissue formation, decrease skin contracture and return to normal epithelialize skin.

  • Plenary Presentation
    Lymphedema stage III with ulcus: What must/can we do? (case report)
    Time: 12:30-13:00
    Speaker
    Tanja Planinsek Rucigaj
    University Medical Centre Ljubljana
    Slovenia
    Biography

    Tanja Planinsek Rucigaj is dermatovenerologist from 2001. In 2003, she was elected for the assistant to the subject of dermatovenerology on Medical Faculty in Ljubljana. Since 2009, she is a lecturer at the College of Health Care Jesenice, now faculty of Health Angela Boskin. In 2015, she was finished two years study of lymphology at European e-Lymph school. Since April 2009, she is a head of Dermatovenerology Clinic, University Medical Centre Ljubljana. She completed her PhD in October 2018. From 2006-2014, she was the president of the Association of Slovenian Dermatovenerologists. Since 2008, she is a vice president of Balkan Venous Forum. Between 2011-2015, she was a president of Wound Management Association Slovenia, then as a vice-president till Jan 2017. From 2016, she is a president of Slovenian Association of Phlebology and Lymphology. She has more than 600 entries in Co-operative Online Bibliographic System/Servis and her publications have been cited over 140 times.

    Abstract

    A 61-year-old patient had damaged a left leg in an accident with a motor. When treatment was complete the left shin was not sufficiently vascularized. Due to an injury, swelling of the left leg with ulcers began to occur. The compression therapy was not possible, since the ankle brachial index was below 0.5, the swelling has increased, and erysipelas were appearing. On the fourth treatment with penicillin, the patient developed an allergic reaction to this antibiotic. The pain in the left legs increased. Since revascularization was not possible, and with insufficient compression therapy of left swollen leg, the question of eventual amputation of left leg above the knee was appeared. The transplantation of lymph nodes from the left axilla to the left popliteal fossa was performed. The edema of the left lower leg was softened and more reduced when patient start to walk, which was restricted due the pain before the surgical therapy. During the walking patient tolerates preventive stockings. At the site of the removal of the lymph nodes on the left thorax a contracture appeared. A limited mobility of the left arm is after physical therapy almost 100%. The erysipelas did not appear anymore.

  • Plenary Presentation
    Atypical ulcers: Definition and diagnosis
    Time: 14:00-14:30
    Speaker
    Sandra Marinovic Kulisic
    University of Zagreb
    Croatia
    Biography

    Sandra Marinovic Kulisic was born in 1976. She currently working in Department of Dermatology and Medicine, University of Zagreb. She completed her education MD, MS in 2008, specialization in dermatovenerology in 2010 and MD, PhD 2014 as research associate. She completed many training courses on vein surgery, wound healing, pediatric allergology and dermatology etc. She is also having membership in various associations like Croatian Medical Association since 2001, Croatian Society Dermatovenerologic Croatian Medical Association since 2003, Croatian Catholic Medical Society since 2004, Croatian Association for early 2007, member of the European Wound Management Association since 2006, a member of the Austrian and Italian society for phlebotomist from the 2010 and UEMS Thematic Federation Wound Healing in 2016. She received various awards like Scientific Award “Borislav Nakic” Croatian Academy of Medical Sciences, for the best scientific work in the field of medicine published in 2008, recognition of the Croatian Medical Association in 2011. She has many publications in international journals.

    Abstract

    Wounds mean distruption of normal continuity of structures. Ulcers are excavations of the skin that reach at least to the deph of the dermis. Ninety- five percent of atypical ulcers manifest as one of the above mentioned entities. Other forms of chronic wounds represent atypical ulcers, which can be caused by autoimmune disorders, infectious diseases, vascular diseases and vasculopathies, metabolic and genetic diseases, neoplasm, external factors, drug related reactions, etc. The features of atypical ulcers are the following; difficult to recognize, pose problems in making an accurate diagnosis, and especially complex treatment. They are characterized by inflammation and infections caudes by rare agents from the enviroment, low virulence microbes, predominantly bacteria and fungi, multiple-resistant strains, opportunistic microbes. The diagnosis of atypical ulcers is very difficult. Althought a wound biopsy generally is recommended in the case of refractory, nonhealing ulcers or when wounds present with atypical signs and symptoms, little is known about the distribution of atypical ulcers. Molecular and histologic analysis of atypical ulcers have been suggested as a method to validate the use of debridment. The non healing edge contains cells with molecular markers indicative of healing impairment.

  • Plenary Presentation
    Pressure injuries in ICU and prevention: A multidisciplinary approach
    Time: 14:30-15:00
    Speaker
    Gisha Paul
    American Hospital Dubai
    United Arab Emirates
    Biography

    Gisha Paul, a certified wound care nurse. She has completed her post graduation in wound mangement from MacEwan University, Canada. She is an ex ICU nurse with great experience and currently, working as a wound care nurse at American Hospital Dubai. She has solid experience in managing cancer, vascular, diabetic, surgical wounds including negative pressure wound therapy.

    Abstract

    The highest incidence of pressure injuries ocuur in ICU in most of the acute care hospitals. Some practioners really find difficulty keeping it below the bench mark. All hospital acquired pressure injury care expences are not covered by the insurance. Hence pressure injuires in critical care patients can creat a big loss of revenue to the organisation and can compromise patient safety. Understanding pressure injuries, stages and prevention methods can reduce this burden of loss to the organiosation. A proper guidline implementation and practices can change this situation. The multidisciplinary rounds on these patients can help to reduce the incidents and will help to manage the situation. Every organistion must have a wound care services, with selected quality indicators.

Video Presentation
Chair
Co-Chair
Speaker
  • Video Presentation
    The centers of premeltons signal the beginning and ends of genes
    Time: 15:00-15:20
    Speaker
    Henry M Sobell
    University of Rochester
    USA
    Biography

    Henry M. Sobell completed his studies at Brooklyn Technical High School (1948-1952), Columbia College (1952-1956), and the University of Virginia School of Medicine (1956-1960). Instead of practicing clinical medicine, he then went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to join Professor Alexander Rich in the Department of Biology (1960-1965), where, as a Helen Hay Whitney Postdoctoral Fellow, he learned the technique of single crystal X-ray analysis. He then joined the Chemistry Department at the University of Rochester, having been subsequently jointly appointed to both the Chemistry and Molecular Biophysics departments (the latter at the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry), becoming a full tenured Professor in both departments (1965-1993).He is now retired and living in the Adirondacks in New York, USA.

    Abstract

    Premeltons are examples of emergent structures (i.e., structural solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally nontopological, undergo breather motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile and being globally topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming Binto A- DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather-motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A- transition), which differs from either A- or B- DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible-and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer-backbone combined with the partial-unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A- DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical-chemistry and molecular-biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5’ and 3’ ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNAsynthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries within it a number of experimental predictions – all readily testable – as will be described in my talk.

  • Video Presentation
    Permanent treatment of vitiligo: Irrianna, immigration of cells in vitiligo disorder
    Time: 15:40-16:00
    Speaker
    Akbar Mohammadrezaei
    Dermatologist
    Iran
    Biography

    Akbar Mohammadrezaei was born in Urmia in 1986/03/29, in west Azerbaijan state of Iran. He is a married men with two children, one son and one daughter. He finished his primary education in 1981 and secondary education in 1985, both in Urmia. He was accepted in medicine department in Tabriz, in 1986. He graduated from medicine department in 1995. He did his military service as a doctor in army. He was afflicted by vitiligo for 14 years. The motivation behind this treatment was his own suffering. For years and years, he did a lot of studies and then could cure himself in 5 months. He hopes all people suffering from this disease will hear their voice and good news.

    Abstract

    This paper is about a skin disorder manifesting itself as white spots in different parts of the body. This disorder is categorized as segmented, focal, generalized and universal vitiligo. The current methods used such as UV rooms may expose many risks and long term side effects to the patients. Furthermore, at the end of the treatment, the patient leaves the clinic in grief and without being really cured. I was suffering from the same disorder for 14 years, so I can understand the sadness of those patients. My motivation to find the medicine was myself. Once, I was a vitiligo patient. Because of my financial problems, I did not have access to labratories. As a result, my only chance was to do a broad self-study to enlarge my understanding about human biology. Thanks to it, I cured myself in 5months and afterwards, many other patients from England, Iran, Turkey and Azerbaijan. In this treatment, I ask my patients to take blood tests. And according to the affected area, I perscribe the vitamins, pills and my own compost creams (different for kids and adults). One time visit every two months will be enough to adjust the dose of the medicine (mostly herbal). My only purpose to write this paper is to provide all my dermatologist coworkers with some information about this treatment. There are many vitiligo patients all around the world waiting for the medicine, praying for it. I hear them, we all do. It is our humanitarian duty to let them know yes, your prayings have been answered. The whole treatment takes about five months and financially is affordable by everyone. If they follow my advice mentioned in the paper, the disorder will not come back. I would kindly ask you to drive through my paper and read it deep. I have cured myself and many others, so I can replicate the medicine on the cases offered by you. The treatment and the progress is easily recognizable from the first month. Note of the translator: My family doctor trusted me with his paper. That is why I could not consult about the translation to anybody. I present my sincere appologies for any terminological mistakes in the abstract. Nooshin Mohammadiasl, Urmia, Iran, 1985.

Day 2

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Basidiomycetes as a multi-purpose cell factory: Current status and perspectives

    Agricultural University of Georgia
    Georgia
    Biography

    Vladimir Elisashvili is a director of the Animal Husbandry and Feed Production Institute of the Agricultural University of Georgia. In 1974, he obtained his PhD in microbiology at the Saint Petersburg (Leningrad) State University. Then, he continued his work at the chair of microbiology as a scientist and assistant professor. In 1983, he joined the Durmishidze Institute of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Tbilisi, Georgia and in 1993, he obtained the Doctor of biological sciences degree in biochemistry. In 1976/77, he obtained a postdoc position at the Institute of Molecular Biology, Paris VII, France. In 2001-2006, he worked at the Free University of Brussels and in two biotechnological companies in Israel. He has over 190 publications and supervised 21 PhD theses. He is serving as an editorial board member of three reputed Journals.

    Abstract

    Recently, extensive research on higher basidiomycetous fungi has markedly increased, mainly due to their potential use in a variety of biotechnological applications, particularly for the production of food, enzymes, dietary supplements, and pharmaceutical compounds. This presentation integrates recent literature and our own data on the physiology of bioactive compounds production, focusing on the common characteristics and unique properties of individual fungi as well as on several approaches providing enhanced yields of target products. Among basidiomycetes, so called medicinal mushrooms constitute a rich source of bioactive compounds exhibiting antitumor, antidiabetic, immunomodulating, antioxidant, antimicrobial and many other properties. However, the production of antioxidants, lectins and exo-polysaccharides is species- and even strain-dependent and some nutrient supplements regulate bioactive compounds synthesis although their effect is very specific depending on fungi physiological peculiarities. An overview of available data underlines that the regulation of lignocellulose-deconstructing enzymes production appears to be subject to complex interplay of nutritional, environmental, and genetic factors. To correctly evaluate the fungi biosynthetic potential and to maximally express cellulase, laccase, lignin and manganese peroxidase activities a fungus specific carbon source/lignocellulosic substrate, an appropriate enzyme synthesis inducer, other required factors should be elucidated. Data received indicate that lignocellulosic growth substrates, some of which contain significant concentrations of soluble carbohydrates and inducers, play a crucial role in enzyme production. Moreover, co-culture of compatible fungi may be an appropriate approach to enhance their biosynthetic activity and yield of target products. Finally, a brief outline of efforts to exploit the whiterot fungi potential for the bioremediation of polluted areas and for sustainable processing of renewable biomass into spectrum of marketable products and energy is also presented.

  • Impact of Darakshak: A bioconsortium on quality, yield and income of pomegranate growers in Karnataka

    University of Horticultural Sciences
    India
    Biography

    Mallikarjun Gurappa Kerutagi is currently working as a university head for the Department of social and allied sciences, UHS, Bagalkot, Karnataka. He was awarded with gold medals at university level from Sri Ramakrishna Mission. He is also a member in academies, have published 50+ articles and also working as a referee for journals. His focus of interest is seed production, horticulture, testing trials, dairy etc.

    Abstract

    Though pomegranate cultivation is a profitable venture but it was adversely affected due to incidence of bacterial blight disease. It has been not fully controlled with the use of presently available chemicals and other methods. Hence, University of Horticultural Sciences, Bagalkot (UHSB) involved in research to find a remedy for the disease as lot of farmers in the growing areas were having the trouble in controlling this disease. UHS, Bagalkot innovated a technology called “Darakshak” a Bioconsortium. Now it has been appreciated by many farmers and there is lot of demand for the product. Hence, a study was conducted to assess its impact on quality of fruits, yield and income. Sample of 30 producers each Darakshak users and non users of Darakshak were selected randomly for the study (2017-18) based on the Darakshak users list. The establishment cost of pomegranate orchard estimated at Rs.2,06,236 per acre in both the cases. The annual cost of cultivation of pomegranate of Darakhsak users was Rs.1,10,347 per acre and in case of non users it was Rs.1,21,342 per acre. Output increased by 13.5 per cent to the users of Darakshak (67.50 quintal) compared to non-users of Darakshak (58.38 quintal). Gross returns received from an acre were Rs.2,71,350 at a price of Rs.4,020 per quintal for Darakshak users but it was less in non Darakshak users (Rs.2,23,069 at a price of Rs.3,821 per quintal). Darakshak was not only increasing the crop yield but also there was improvement in the quality of fruits. Darakshak users received better price for their fruits compared to non users, though both of them sold in the same market. Pomegranate cultivation was more profitable in case of Darakshak users as indicated by B:C ratio of 2.62 which was less in case of non users (B:C ratio 1.83). Majority of the producers expressed that bacterial blight was the major production problem followed by irrigation, decreasing yield and fluctuation in prices. Pomegranate producers opined that Darakshak is more effective on blight disease, improved the crop health and quality of the fruit. This ultimately increased the yield and income of the producers and also there was reduction in the production cost. These were the main reasons for farmers using the Darakshak developed by UHS Bagalkot, Karnataka.

Workshop
Speaker
  • Workshop Presentation
    1st Balkan wound management associations platforms: Patient in the focus
    Time: 11:50-12:50
    Speaker
    Jasmina Begic
    Association of Wound Management
    Bosnia and Herzegovina
    Biography

    Jasmina Begic is a Medical Consultant for BIOPTRON, Zepter Internastional for Bosnia and Herzegovina, Founder of Association for Wound management in B&H, Founder and author of Euro-Asian Forum, one of founder of www.BALWMA.org. She is currently working as a Dermatovenerologyst in Bioptron International team-Wound Healing and also a certified VCC trainer of elderly care; certified VCC trainer of manager EU founds; certified practitioner of TCM; certified practitioner of herbal medicine. She finished her graduation and post-graduation studies at Medical School of University Sarajevo, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina and completed her PhD in the field of Tissue Regeneration and Wound Healing from Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur. She did volunteer works in Association for Wound management in Bosnia and Herzegovina (AWMinB&H) from 2008 till present. She is also active member in UEMS TF WH, EWMA, EADV. Her projects are involved in Clinical Research “Appliance Bioptron polarized light (480 -3400nm) in the therapy of dermatosis: Acne vulgaris and Ulcer cruris” which is approved by members of Scientifically Research Institute of Clinical Center of University in Sarajevo and Members of Ethics Commitee of Clinical Center University in Sarajevo; Euro-Asian Forum of Association for Wound Management (2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, 2018); Academy for health and social occupation (2013); Implementation of Traditional Chinese Medicine in health and stationary institution in Bosnia and Herzegovina and country of Western Balkan (2014); Balkan Wound Management Association (2015); Integrative Medicine in Postoperative Management (2017); Integrative medicine: Prevention is best cure of Pressure Ulcers (2017).

    Abstract

    Introduction: Balkan Wound Management Association, BALWMA, is founded in Sarajevo in August 2014. Participation of Balkan Countries, because the global trend of regional associations “based on common interest and solidarity”. All country associations are members in the European Wound Management Association (EWMA). Worldwide trend of regional networking – Facebook, Tweeter, Instagram, etc. launched as social networks for connecting people and information exchange, later recognized as a power tool for business promotion and development. Corporate Sponsors, regional approach in programming in addition to their country programs. The region of the Balkan is considered by many current and prospective companies to offer opportunities as a large market. International organizations and industry have departments for Balkans and do regional programming and business plans in addition to their country plans. The Global Telemedicine market will reach $ 41,2 Billion by 2021. Aim: Education about EU principles in the wound healing for medical staff, collaboration with medical institution, Goverment, NGO, medical chambers, industry on the domestic/English language, decrease the cost of travel, accommodation in the countries, members of BALWMA. E leaning: Globalisation of EU standards for medical team, professionals, patients, society. Partnership. Connect patients and doctor, 24/7. Benefit for patients, benefits for the doctors. Networking of labor market Global health service. To be mobile for patients with chronic wounds. Improve quality of life. Improve quality of life Medical tourism.

Scientific Sessions: Microbial Immunology & Infection Control | Microbial Biotechnology
Chair
Speaker
  • Pleenary Presentation
    Human papillomavirus infection in genital women in four regions of Senegal
    Time: 14:00-14:30
    Speaker
    Dr. El Hadji Seydou Mbaye
    3Cancer Institute, Aristide Le Dantec Hospital, Dakar, Senegal
    West Africa
    Biography

    Dr. El Hadji Seydou Mbaye was born in 1978 in Kaolack a region of Senegal. During 2008-2013, he earned his PhD in Biology and Human Pathologies with the collaboration of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) /WHO, Lyon (France); 2006-2007 : Master of Life and Health, Specialty Biology of microorganisms, Virology in Louis Pasteur University of Strasbourg (France); 2005-2006 : Master of Life and Health, option of Immuno-physiopathology in Louis Pasteur University of Strasbourg (France); 2004-2005 : License of Biochemistry in Louis Pasteur University of Strasbourg (France); 2002-2004 : General Degree in Sciences and Technologies in University of METZ (France). He was certified, by the United Nations for Basic Notion of Security on the Ground-Protection, Health and behavior, by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC)/World Health Organization, Lyon (France) for Safety Certificate. He has published 1 Book with a style of philosophical story. Author of the world program against cancer in low and middle incomes countries, he is lead author (first listed) of more than 90 peer-reviewed research articles published in reputed journals. He is Review Board Member of Acta Scientific Medical Sciences (ASMS), Acta Scientific Microbiology (ASMI), Research and Reviews on Healthcare: Open Access Journal (RRHOAJ), and Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences (JMMS), Modern Journal of Medicine and Biology (MJMB), EC Microbiology, International Journal of Clinical Virology (IJCV), Acta Scientific Cancer Biology (ASCB), BioMed Research Journal (BMRJ), Journal of Medicine and Biology (JMB), Biomedical Research, International journal of vaccines and technologies (IJVT), Journal of Surgery, Operative Techniques and Anaesthesia (JSOTA), Current Research in Bioengineering & Biomedical Sciences (CRBBS), Journal of Women's Health, Gynecology & Obstetrics (JWHGO), Trauma & Emergency Care journal, Journal of Current Medical Research and Opinion (JCMRO), International Journal of Clinical Pharmacology & Pharmacotherapy (IJCPP), Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (JCMID), Journal of Retro Virology and Anti Retro Virology (JRVAV), Journal of Antivirals and Antiretrovirals, Research and Reports in Immunology (RRI), Journal of Medical Case Reports and Reviews (JMCRR), Pyrex Journal of Biomedical Research (PJBR), Advances in Immunology and Microbiology (ADIM), Current Scientific Research in Biomedical Sciences (CSRBS), Journal of Clinical & Experimental Immunology (JCEI), Journal of AIDS and HIV Treatment, Edelweiss Journal of AIDS, Journal of HIV and AIDS, Journal of HIV and AIDS Research, Associate Editors for Journal of Bacteriology & Mycology

    Abstract

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in Senegal. However, there are few data concerning the HPV types inducing neoplasia and cervical cancers and their prevalence, in the general population of Senegal. Aim: The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of HPV infection in Senegalese women aged from 18 years and older. Materials and Methods: A study was performed on 498 cervix samples collected from healthy women aged 18 and older in Dakar. 438 other samples were collected from three other regions, Thies, Saint Louis and Louga. The samples were screened for 21 HPV genotypes using an HPV type-specific E7 PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping assay (TS-MPG) which is a laboratory-developed method for the detection of HPV. Results: The prevalence for pHR/HR-HPV in the region of Dakar was 20.68%. HPV 52 (3.21%) was the most prevalent HPV type, followed by HPV 16 (3.01%) and HPV 31 (3.01%). In the regions of Thies, Louga and Saint Louis, the prevalence for pHR/HR-HPV was 29.19%, 23.15% and 20% respectively. Conclusion: The study revealed the specificity of the HR-HPV prevalence in Dakar and other regions of Senegal. The patterns differs from the one observed in the other regions of the world and rise the issue of the development of vaccination program in the country. Such a program should take into account the real HPV prevalence for an effective protection of HPV-associated diseases.

  • Plenary Presentation
    Production of 4-methyl-1-pentanol biofuel from monomers of poly(3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate)
    Time: 14:30-15:00
    Speaker
    Paul R Gill
    Ecosystem Intrinsics
    Uruguay
    Biography

    Paul R Gill have worked, studied and taught as a Uruguayan scientist since 1993. He was initially invited to teach molecular genetics of model nitrogen-fixing plant root-associated bacterium, Rhizobium meliloti, for three months in the IIBCE. His research background is biochemistry and molecular genetics, with studies on flagellar development in Caulobacter and on plant protection and nutrient supply by Pseudomonas and Rhizobium, respectively. Current studies with endophyte Herbaspirillum seropedicae focus on a link between flagellar assembly and biofilm formation as well as its ability to accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs).

    Abstract

    Sustainable alternatives for petroleum-based products such as plastics and gasoline must be developed promptly. Herbaspirillum seropedicae is an endophyte that naturally produces polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs), like many bacteria. PHAs are widely considered to be bioplastics, and poly-3-hydroxybutyrate, PHB, which is most commonly produced by many bacteria is stiff, brittle and has few applications. Copolymers like poly-3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydoxyvalerate, P(3HB-co-3HV), on the other hand, are more flexible, durable and more like polypropylene. What is not appreciated or reported in the literature is that monomers of other PHAs, e.g.,poly(3-hydroxy-4-methylvalerate), PH(4me)V,can be chemically or biochemically reduced to branched-chain higher alcohols which are next generation biofuels, for PH(4me)V conversion is to 4-methyl-1-pentanol. Development of biofuels from PHAs with higher energy density and lower vapor pressure than ethanol, e.g., 4-methyl-1-pentanol, significantly expands use of PHAs as alternatives for petroleum based products and well beyond use as bioplastics. Our previous studies showed that H. seropedicae accumulates PHB when grown on glucose in which two acetyl-CoAs are condensed to form the 3HB monomer substrate. We also showed that the co-polymer, P(3HB-co-3HV), was produced when this bacterium was grown on glucose and nonanoic acid as co-substrate. Beta-oxidation of nonanoic acid results in formation of propionyl-CoA which condenses with acetyl-CoA to form the 3HV monomer substrate. We also found that a PrPC mutant of this bacterium, in which propionate is not effectively catabolized, produced significantly higher amounts of P(3HB-co-3HV). For production of a PHA with a six carbon monomer, we propose to overexpress an ilvIHCD operon in H. seropedicae such that a high level of 2-ketoisovalerate, valine metabolite, is produced. Condensation of the CoA derivative of 2-ketoisovalerate (i.e.,isobutyryl-CoA) with acetyl-CoA forms PHA monomer substrate, 3-hydroxy-4-methylvaleryl-CoA. The PHA produced is PH(4me)V, a naturally occurring PHA that should accumulate in H. seropedicae. Monomers of this PHA will then be isolated and reduced to the corresponding aldehyde and alcohol, i.e., PHA monomer 3-hydroxy-4-methyl pentanoic acid (3-hydrox-4-methyl valeric acid) to 4-methyl pentanoic acid then to 4-methyl pentanal and then to 4-methyl pentanol. Removal of the 3-hydroxy group will make use of part of a glutamate fermentation pathway used by some Clostridia that involves conversion of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to butyryl-CoA (Dawes & Sutherland, 1992). Also, extracts of Clostridium butyricum can be used to reduce a fatty acyl-CoA to the corresponding aldehyde and alcohol (Day et al., 1970). A large number of PHA depolymerases have also been described, e.g., in various Clostridia. The 4-methyl pentanol produced will then be tested as fuel like ethanol. Our proposed study will focus on PH(4me)V production in the lab using standard methods for PHA production, isolation and characterization. Recombinant H. seropedicae overexpressing an ilvIHCD operon from another Herbaspirillum sp., an Oxalobacteraceae or Burkholderiales will be tested for PH(4me)V production.

Poster Presentations
Chair
Co-Chair
Advisor
Speaker
  • Poster Presentation
    Scar formation and patient satisfaction after thyroidectomy with and without surgical drains
    Time: PP01
    Speaker
    Hyungsuk Yi
    Kosin University College of Medicine
    South Korea
    Biography

    Hyungsuk Yi is a plastic surgeon. He is an assistant professor of Kosin University, Busan, South Korea. He is the chairman of Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. He is an academic director at the Wound Research Society of Busan, South Korea.

    Abstract

    Background: Several comparative studies have documented the outcomes of negative pressure drain use after thyroidectomy. However, these previous studies did not focus on scar formation. The aim of this study was to compare thyroidectomy outcomes with and without negative pressure drain use in terms of scar formation. Methods: Nine hundred seventy-five patients who underwent thyroidectomy between January 2012 and December 2013, at Kosin University Gospel Hospital were enrolled in this study. Patients were assigned to one of two groups at the surgeon’s discretion: the negative pressure drain group (n=515) or the no drain group (n=460). Medical records were reviewed, and the incidence and severity of scar formation were compared. We estimated patient satisfaction seven months postoperatively based on esthetic and functional outcomes using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale. Results: The incidence of mild scarring was higher in the no drain group, but this difference was not statistically significant (P=0.069). The incidence of severe scarring was significantly higher in the negative pressure drain group (5.83%, P<0.001). Based on the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale data from 205 patients, patient satisfaction was significantly higher in the no drain group (P=0.006). Itching was reported significantly less frequently in the no drain group (P=0.034). There were no significant differences between groups with respect to pain or observer scar scale score. Conclusion: This study suggests that not using a drain after thyroidectomy leads to high patient satisfaction and reduces the likelihood of severe scar formation.

  • Poster Presentation
    Wound healing of oralmucositis by the use of preventive laser photobiomodulation in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing radiochemotherapy
    Time: PP03
    Speaker
    Alena Ribeiro Alves Peixoto Medrado
    School of Medicine and Public Health
    Brazil
    Biography

    Alena Ribeiro Alves Peixoto Medrado has completed her PhD at the age of 25 years from Federal University of Bahia, BR. She is professor of Federal University of Bahia, BR. Currently, working as assistant professor at Bahiana – School of Medicine and Public Health, BR. She has over 200 publications that have been cited over 200 times and her publication h-index is 20 and has been serving as an editorial board member of reputed Journals.

    Abstract

    Objective: To evaluate the preventive effect of laser photobiomodulation in the development of radio/chemotherapy treatment in patients with head and neck cancer. Methods: This randomized clinical study included patients undergoing radiotherapy with or without associated chemotherapy. The patients were allocated randomly to the laser (LG, n = 30) and control (CG, n = 26) groups. The LG (AsGaAl, 660 nm laser, 86.7 mW, 2 J/cm2) participated in the preventive protocol, while the CG underwent a simulated procedure without light emission (sham). The degree of oral mucositis (OM), salivary flow and referred pain were evaluated at the beginning of radiation therapy and during the 6th, 12th, 18th and 24th sessions. Results: Patients of both groups showed a significant increase in the degree of OM, according to the progression of the radiotherapy sessions (p < 0.01). Regarding OM, salivary flow, and pain related to the oral cavity, there was no significant difference between the groups in all periods assessed (p > 0.05). There was a significant reduction of salivary flow from the 6th session when compared to the values from the start of radiotherapy. The photobiomodulation laser did not affect the experience of pain in patients during treatment (p < 0.001) when compared to that during the start of treatment. Conclusions: The photobiomodulation laser protocol used in this study was not effective in preventing OM radiationchemotherapy-induced OM in patients with head and neck cancer.

  • Poster Presentation
    Slight improvement of the effectiveness in treating cleft lip scars with silicone gel versus silicone sheet: A secondary analysis
    Time: PP03
    Speaker
    Yensheng Wang
    Yale University School of Public Health
    USA
    Biography

    Yensheng Wang has completed his MD at Chang-gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan in 2015. He devoted to clinical studies that discover potential treatments for surgical wounds. He also engaged in discovering investigation techniques and treatment for allergic diseases and cancers. Yensheng is currently a graduate student at Yale University School of Public Health.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Silicone sheet is often used for preventing cleft lip scar postoperatively with concerns of ingestion, application site irritation and short application time. Silicone gel has daylong application duration with better safety. Previous study suggested no difference between forms of silicone in treating cleft lip scarring without controlling potential confounders. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of silicone gel versus sheet in a different model, controlling surgical gap, side and patient effects. Method: Data was retrieved from previous study with additonal information from the author. In short, silicone gel/sheets were randomly assigned to the patients. Clinical scar evaluation scores (VSS, VAS, width) were measured 6 month after application. Transformation was performed for normailzation and direction purpose. Generalized linear model was performed controlling the measurement, age, gap and patient effects with Tukey’s adjustment. Sensitivity analysis was performed to compare the result. Result: There are 29 observations in sheet group with mean VSS 0.46 (SD 0.11), mean 10/VAS 1.42 (SD 1.20) and mean width 2.75 (SD 1.44). There are 26 observations in gel group, with mean VSS 0.41 (SD 0.13), mean 10/VAS 1.35 (SD 0.18) and mean width 2.06 (SD 1.71). Silicone gel had a lower score compared to sheet after tukey’s adjustment(p=0.0048, 95CI: 0.05, 0.26). Sensitivity analysis showed a similar result. Conclusion: Silicone gel appeared to slightly improve postoperative cleft lip scars compared to silicon sheet. With the advantage of safety and patient-friendly features, silicon gel could be recommended for postoperative care of cleft lip scars in infants.

  • Poster Presentation
    Slight improvement of the effectiveness in treating cleft lip scars with silicone gel versus silicone sheet: A secondary analysis
    Time: PP04
    Speaker
    Qiaowan Lee
    Taipei City Hospital
    Taiwan
    Biography

    Qiaowan Lee has completed her MD at Chang-gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan in 2015. She devoted to clinical studies that discover potential treatments for surgical wounds. Qiaowan is currently a resident doctor at Taipei City Hospital, Taiwan.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Silicone sheet is often used for preventing cleft lip scar postoperatively with concerns of ingestion, application site irritation and short application time. Silicone gel has daylong application duration with better safety. Previous study suggested no difference between forms of silicone in treating cleft lip scarring without controlling potential confounders. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of silicone gel versus sheet in a different model, controlling surgical gap, side and patient effects. Method: Data was retrieved from previous study with additonal information from the author. In short, silicone gel/sheets were randomly assigned to the patients. Clinical scar evaluation scores (VSS, VAS, width) were measured 6 month after application. Transformation was performed for normailzation and direction purpose. Generalized linear model was performed controlling the measurement, age, gap and patient effects with Tukey’s adjustment. Sensitivity analysis was performed to compare the result. Result: There are 29 observations in sheet group with mean VSS 0.46 (SD 0.11), mean 10/VAS 1.42 (SD 1.20) and mean width 2.75 (SD 1.44). There are 26 observations in gel group, with mean VSS 0.41 (SD 0.13), mean 10/VAS 1.35 (SD 0.18) and mean width 2.06 (SD 1.71). Silicone gel had a lower score compared to sheet after tukey’s adjustment(p=0.0048, 95CI: 0.05, 0.26). Sensitivity analysis showed a similar result. Conclusion: Silicone gel appeared to slightly improve postoperative cleft lip scars compared to silicon sheet. With the advantage of safety and patient-friendly features, silicon gel could be recommended for postoperative care of cleft lip scars in infants.

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If an allied academy cancels this event for any reason, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another allied academies event which must occur within one year from the date of cancellation.

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If allied academies postpone an event for any reason and you are unable or unwilling to attend on rescheduled dates, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another e allied academies event which must occur within one year from the date of postponement.

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All fully paid registrations are transferable to other persons from the same organization if registered person is unable to attend the event. Transfers must be made by the registered person in writing to woundcare@alliedconferences.org. Details must be included the full name of replacement person, their title, contact phone number and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified.

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If the registrant is unable to attend and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

Keeping in view of advance payments towards Venue, Printing, Shipping, Hotels and other overheads, we had to keep Refund Policy is as following slabs-

Before 60 days of the conference: Eligible for Full Refund less $100 Service Fee

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