Scientific Program

Day 1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • The detection of hidden plasmodium infection in laos

    National Center for Global Health and Medicine
    Japan
    Biography

    Professor Shigeyuki Kano, MD, PhD is Director of the Department of Tropical Medicine and Malaria, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Japan. He is President of Japanese Society of Tropical Medicine, and currently, Board Member of Japan Association for International Health, Japanese Society of Travel and Health, Japanese Society of Clinical Parasitology, the Japanese Society of Parasitology, member of ASTMH, Fellow of RSTMH, and Expanded Board member of International Federation for Tropical Medicine (IFTM). He has been serving as an advisor of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) for the malaria control project under Japanese ODA or Global Fund. He also belongs to Institut Pasteur du Laos (IPL) as Head of Lao-Japan Parasitology Laboratory under SATREPS (JICA/AMED) Project, in Vientiane, Lao PDR.

    Abstract

    Microscopy and malaria rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) are used to diagnose malaria in the Lao PDR. In order to evaluate the performance of a highly sensitive PCR technique in comparison to microscopy and the RDTs, as well as to understand the precise malaria situation, a small pilot study was conducted in a highly endemic Attapeu province in 2015. 381 volunteers from villages in Attapeu participated in the survey. Microscopy, RDTs and a real-time nested PCR were used to detect Plasmodium infections and their results were compared. The numbers of infections detected by the 3 methods were as follows: 1 P. falciparum and 2 P. vivax by microscopy; 2 P. falciparum and 3 P. vivax by RDTs; and 35 Plasmodium including 2 P. falciparum, 32 P. vivax and 1 mixed infection by the PCR. All the participants with parasitemia were asymptomatic showing body temperatures of <37.1°C. It was reported in the “World Malaria Report 2016” that the malaria burden in the Lao PDR was, as a whole, decreasing, but our present study provide that many asymptomatic Plasmodium carriers were in the study area, of whom P. vivax was the dominant species as high as 94.3%. In fact, Ministry of Health of Lao PDR has declared that malaria is to be eliminated by 2030 in the country. To achieve this goal, highly sensitive diagnostic tests including PCR-based diagnostic methods should be employed, and targeted elimination plans for the hidden P. vivax infections should be designed and implemented.

  • LEPPTOSPIROSIS: THE USE OF MULTI LOCUS SEQUENCE TYPING AND DERRIVED SPECIES IDENTIFCATION DIRECTLY ON CLINICAL SPECIMENS

    Public Health England
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Victoria Chalker studied Medical Microbiology BSc from the University of Newcastle, quorum sensing PhD (Nottingham University/Umea University, Sweden) and has worked on pathogen discovery from Royal Veterinary College, led Molecular Microbiology Unit for UK NEQAS for Microbiology, gained Clinical Scientist status, STI and respiratory bacterial infection specialist scientist Public Helath England and is now Head, Respiratory & Vaccine Preventable Bacteria Reference Unit, PHE with remit for several microbial genera including Streptococci, Legionella and Leptospira and seconded to the Office of the Chief Scientific Officer, NHS England focussing on diagnostics and antimicrobial resistance. She has more than 50 papers and 4 patents.

    Abstract

    Leptospirosis is a worldwide zoonotic disease caused by Pathogenic Leptospira. In the UK, Leptospirosis disease and surveillance previously depended on laboratory data from culture and the Microscopic Agglutination Test (MAT) considered gold standard methods for detection of infection. Traditional Leptospira species identification requires an isolate, however culture is time-consuming taking several weeks and requires significant laboratory expertise to visualise live Leptospires. Indigenous and imported human leptospirosis is detected in England and Wales, with 40-100 laboratory confirmed cases per year. It is likely that there are further cases which are undiagnosed, particularly those with milder manifestations. Small outbreaks are detected intermittently, the most recent being a cluster of cases associated with a triathlon in 2014. The combined clinical diagnostic and reference service provided by the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory (RIPL, PHE Porton) and the Bacteriology Reference Department (BRD, PHE Colindale) developed a nested MLST method for use directly on clinical specimens that enables direct identification of the species and simultaneous typing of pathogenic Leptospires. Clinical DNA specimen extracts, submitted to the Leptospira Reference Unit underwent 16s qPCR testing, MLST typing and species identification. The reasons for referral ranged from occupational exposure to holiday acquired infection and common clinical symptoms included: flu like symptoms, fever and kidney or liver symptoms.

Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Chair
Speaker
  • 1
    Investigation on the familial aggregation and spatial aggregation of human leishmania infection in tanchang county, gansu province, china
    Time: 11:50-12:20
    Speaker
    yayi guan
    Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China
    China
    Biography

    Dr. GUAN Ya-yi, M.S., M.M., Ph.D, obtained her doctoral degree in Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention (China CDC). Her research field is molecular epidemiology, health economics and global health. She obtained Bachelor and Master degree at Hunan Medical College (Changsha, Hunan province, P.R.China), Tongji Medical College (Wuhan, Hubei province, P.R.China), and Chulalongkorn University (Bangkok, Thailand). She has been working at the National Institute of Parasitic Diseaseas in Shanghai, China since 1989 and taken the role as principal investigators or key members of several projects on malaria, leishmaniasis and echinococcosis.

    Abstract

    Visceral Leishmaniasis, also known as kala-azar, is a vector-borne disease caused by the Leishmania species complex. In China, there have been a continuous popularity inhill-type kala-azar endemic areas, mainly in southern Gansu province and northern Sichuan province. The research aimed to investigate whether the distribution of human Leishmania infection showed the characteristics familial aggregation and spatial aggregation, and provides a reference for the further control of kala-azar. The binomial distribution goodness of fit test and SaTScan software were applied for analyzing family GPS positioning information and laboratory test results of the family members. It was found that the distribution of human Leishmania infection corresponded to binomial distribution and did not conform to the family aggregation and spatial aggregation. In consideration of the local population and domestic animals were universally infected and widely distributed in different families and regions, their role as reservoir host during the spread of kala-azar should be emphasized. At the same time, it also implied vector control could be the key for kala-azar prevention and control in the hill-type endemic areas in Gansu province, China.

  • 2
    ATTACKING MALARIA TRANSMISSION BY ISOLATING MALE AND FEMALE GAMETOCYTES.
    Time: 12:20-12:50
    Speaker
    Christopher lloyd Peaty
    Australian Army Malaria Institute, Australia
    Australia
    Biography

    Christopher Peatey completed his PhD in 2011 at the Queensland University in Australia. He is now working as a Scientific Officer for the Australian Army Malaria Institute. His work includes determining the causes of artemisinin induced dormancy, looking at signalling pathways behind the switch to gametogenesis in Plasmodium falciparum and also looking at causes for the loss of HRPII in malaria species globally. He has 13 publications with over 370 citations and his H index is 11. He has presented at several major international conferences including ASTMH and Woods Hole MPM. He spent 4 years serving on the Executive Board of the Australian Society for Parasitology.

    Abstract

    The transmission stages of Plasmodium falciparum – gametocytes – were the first malaria parasites identified. In order to eradicate malaria it will be necessary to ensure that populations of gametocytes can be cleared from patients in endemic areas. Gametocytes are sexually dimorphic and both sexes are required to complete the mosquito cycle of the parasite. Only the male or the female gametocyte therefore, needs to be neutralised. Despite much research, there are still many unanswered questions about gametocytes and their biology. Here we report on new techniques that have allowed us to differentially sort male and female gametocytes to perform further research. These methods rely on some unique biological properties of gametocytes that can be exploited by the use of flow cytometry. Using specific dyes, pure samples of either male or female gametocytes can now be sorted using flow cytometry. These gametocytes can then be treated with anti-malarial drugs to determine if the drugs have gametocytocidal effects. Several different classes of anti-malarials were used and are reported on. One of these drugs was once a common anti-malarial drug – methylene blue. We are also able to report on a new proposed mode of action for this drug. The treated gametocytes are able to be membrane fed to Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes to determine if they are still infective after drug treatment. These results will be important as we continue to move towards the eradication of malaria.

  • 3
    ANALYSIS OF HISTORICAL TRENDS AND RECENT ELIMINATION OF MALARIA FROM SRI LANKA AND ITS APPLICABILITY FOR MALARIA CONTROL IN OTHER COUNTRIES
    Time: 13:50-14:20
    Speaker
    Ranjan Ramasamy
    ID-Fish Technology
    USA
    Biography

    Ranjan Ramasamy graduated from the University of Cambridge, UK and then obtained a PhD also from the University of Cambridge. He has since held academic appointments in the UK and abroad including Australia, Sri Lanka and the USA. He was the Chairman of the National Science Foundation of Sri Lanka, Professor of Life Sciences at the Institute of Fundamental Studies in Kandy in Sri Lanka, Professor of Biochemistry in the University of Jaffna in Jaffna Sri Lanka, Professor of Immunology in the University Brunei Darussalam Medical School and held institute/ university appointments at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla in the USA, University of Nairobi in Kenya, King Faisal University in Dammam in Saudi Arabia, the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Australia, Anglia Ruskin University in England and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in England. He has more than 200 publications in fields pertaining to Medical Sciences.

    Abstract

    Sri Lanka is a tropical island located South of India in the Indian Ocean. Malaria has been prevalent in the island for centuries but the country succeeded in eliminating the disease in 2012. Factors governing the past endemicity of malaria and its successful elimination from Sri Lanka in 2012 are analyzed. There is evidence that malaria might have been first introduced in the 13th century into a dry zone area with extensive irrigation works. Regular widespread epidemics of the disease have been documented in the 20th century. The island nature of Sri Lanka, generally low transmission rates, widespread and accessible government hospitals and clinics that provide free and readily available diagnosis and treatment for malaria, adequate financial support and commitment to the Anti-Malaria Campaign (AMC),national and decentralized malaria control efforts sustained over a long period by dedicated and competent AMC staff, and the absence of zoonotic malaria are recognized as key factorsresponsible for eliminating malaria from Sri Lanka. These factors are analyzed in the context of their relevance to the present malaria elimination efforts in other countries with the overall aim of globally eradicating the disease.

  • 4
    THE BURDEN OF VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS INFECTION IN CHILDREN OF A NEW ENDEMIC AREA IN BRAZIL: IS IT POSSIBLE TO STEM THE TIDE OF THE EPIDEMIC?
    Time: 15:00-15:30
    Speaker
    Luiz Euribel Prestes Carneiro
    West Paulista University
    Brazil
    Biography

    Luiz Euribel Prestes Carneiro. Graduated in medicine and Medical specialization in Infectious Diseases; master's degree in Biological Sciences (Cellular and Molecular Biology) and Ph.D. in Immunology at University of Sao Paulo. He is currently a professor of Medicine, coordinator of the Master in Health Sciences (Medicine II) and a professor of the Environment and Regional Developing master course, West Paulista University, Presidente Prudente, Sao Paulo. He works as a physician in the Emergency Department of the Regional Hospital of Presidente Prudente and as an Infectologist at the State Maternity of Presidente Prudente. Has 23 articles published in PubMed, belongs to the editorial board of 2 Brazilian journals, 5 international scientific journals and acts as reviewer for 27 international journals. He has experience in the area of Immunology and Infectious Diseases, with emphasis on Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Viral Hepatitis, Visceral leishmaniasis and Primary Immunodeficiencies.

    Abstract

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) ranks second among the neglected diseases with higher prevalence in both subtropical and tropical regions and in the Americas, being that in 2013 Brazil harbored 96% of the cases. Despite the measures adopted throughout São Paulo state, there are evidences that VL is spreading in a fast and alarming way in the western region. Since 2005, when the first case was reported until 2015, human VL was found in 18/45 municipalities of the Regional Healthcare. During this period, 416 human cases and 27 deaths were reported. Our aim was to analyze the clinical characteristics of VL infected children treated in a regional reference university hospital, located in the western region of São Paulo state, as well as the regional measures adopted to control the spreading of VL. Preliminary results showed that from January 2009 to December 2013, 97 children were treated. The onset of symptoms,diagnosis and treatment occurred in 19.3±13.54-25.04 daysand the hospitalization time was 13.5±11.73-15.22 days.Laboratory parameters showed: Hemoglobin: 9.3±8.98-9.67.g/dL; Haematocrit: 29.2±28.25-30.15%; Platelets:163±139-187.cells/mm3; Leukocytes: 5.1±4.63-5.58 cells/mm3; Albumin: 3.1±2.96-3.23g/L; Globulins: 3.2±3.09-3.48g/L; AST: 106.9 ±74.78-138.9 UI/L; ALT: 50.3±35.58-65.06UI/L; Prothrombin: 12.9±12.37-13.48s. Among the measures taken are: health care workers’ continued education; early treatment of humans and infected dogs; construction of vector/zoonosis centers; and implementation of increased education programs. Thus, onset diagnosis and curative practices fueled by integrated actions for monitoring the disease may stem the tide of VL infection in the western region of Sao Paulo state.

  • 5
    AN OUTBREAK OF DIARRHEA IN MANDERA, KENYA DUE TO ESCHERICHIA COLI SEROGROUP O-UNTYPABLE STRAIN THAT HAD A CODING GENE FOR ENTEROAGGREGATIVE E. COLI HEATSTABLE ENTEROTOXIN 1
    Time: 16:00-16:30
    Speaker
    Yoshio Ichinose
    Nagasaki International University
    Japan
    Biography

    Yoshio Ichinose has been graduated with speciality including intenal medicine and gynecology and obstetrician, and got a PhD degree, Postgraduate School of Medicine, Nagasaki University in 1985. He joined School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus as an Assistant Professor afterwards served as a Lecturer at Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University at 1994. In 2006 he started working as Professor at Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University. Currently he is serving as Chief Representative of Kenya Research Station (NUITM-KEMRI Project).

    Abstract

    In an outbreak of gastroenteritis on 16 December 2009, in Mandera, Kenya, Escherichia coli O-untypable (OUT) strain was isolated from stool specimens of patients (18/24,75%). The E. coli OUT organisms could not be assigned to any of the recognized diarrheagenic groups of E. coli. However, they possessed the EAggEC heat-stable enterotoxin (EAST1) gene. The cell-free culture filtrate of EASTEC strain isolated from the outbreak case induced a considerable amount of fluid accumulation (FA) in suckling mouse intestine, indicating production of an enterotoxic factor(s). These results identify EASTEC as the etiological agent of the diarrheal outbreak in Mandera. This is the first report, to our knowledge, demonstrating the diarrheagenicity of EASTEC by using an animal model. It is considered necessary to characterize the FA factor(s) and to study dissemination of the EASTEC strains producing the enterotoxic factor(s) to assess the public health significance of the strains distributed in the environment.

Day 2

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • FLUORESCENCE IN SITU HYBRIDIZATION (FISH) ASSAYS FOR DIAGNOSING MALARIA IN ENDEMIC AREAS

    ID-Fish Technology
    USA
    Biography

    Ranjan Ramasamy graduated from the University of Cambridge, UK and then obtained a PhD also from the University of Cambridge. He has since held academic appointments in the UK and abroad including Australia, Sri Lanka and the USA. He was the Chairman of the National Science Foundation of Sri Lanka, Professor of Life Sciences at the Institute of Fundamental Studies in Kandy in Sri Lanka, Professor of Biochemistry in the University of Jaffna in Jaffna Sri Lanka, Professor of Immunology in the University Brunei Darussalam Medical School and held institute/ university appointments at the Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation in La Jolla in the USA, University of Nairobi in Kenya, King Faisal University in Dammam in Saudi Arabia, the Queensland Institute of Medical Research in Australia, Anglia Ruskin University in England and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine in England. He has more than 200 publications in fields pertaining to Medical Sciences.

    Abstract

    Malaria is a responsible for approximately 600 thousand deaths worldwide every year. Appropriate and timely treatment of malaria can prevent deaths but is dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the infection. Currently,microscopic examination of the Giemsa stained blood smears is the method of choice for diagnosing malaria. Although it has limited sensitivity and specificity in field conditions, it still remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of malaria.Here, we report the development of a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) based method for detecting malaria infection in blood smears and describe the use of an LED light source that makes the method suitable for use in resourcelimited malaria endemic countries. The Plasmodium Genus (P-Genus) FISH assay has a Plasmodium genus specific probe that detects all five species of Plasmodium known to cause the disease in humans. The P. falciparum (PF) FISH assay and P. vivax (PV) FISH assay detect and differentiate between P. falciparum and P. vivax respectively from other Plasmodium species. The FISH assays are more sensitive than Giemsa. The sensitivities of P-Genus, PF and PV FISH assays were found to be 98.2%, 94.5% and 98.3%, respectively compared to 89.9%, 83.3% and 87.9% for the detection of Plasmodium,P. falciparum and P. vivax by Giemsa staining respectively

  • Novel antimalarial compound act-451840: preclinical assessment

    Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute
    Switzerland
    Biography

    Dr. Sergio WITTLIN is a group leader at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH). He received his PhD in biochemistry from the Biozentrum (University of Basel, Switzerland) in 1999 and obtained a 3 years of postdoctoral experience in molecular genetics at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute (Melbourne, Australia). In 2002 he moved to the Swiss TPH, where his research is focused on the malaria parasite in cell culture assays and mouse models, with the ultimate aim to discover new antimalarial drugs in a multidisciplinary approach. In 15 years of collaboration with the Medicines for Malaria Venture (MMV) in Geneva, his laboratory was significantly involved in moving 4 compounds in the MMV pipeline into clinical trials.

    Abstract

    Addressing the urgent need for the development of new antimalarials, a chemical class of potent antimalarial compounds with a novel mode of action was recently identified. Here, the preclinical characterization of one of these compounds, ACT-451840, conducted in partnership with academic and industrial groups is presented. The properties of ACT-451840 are described, including its spectrum of activities against multiple life cycle stages of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum (asexual and sexual) and Plasmodium vivax (asexual) as well as oral in vivo efficacies in two murine malaria models that permit infection with the human and the rodent parasites P.falciparum and Plasmodium berghei, respectively. In vitro, ACT-451840 showed a 50% inhibition concentration of 0.4nM against the drug-sensitive P. falciparum NF54 strain. The 90% effective doses in the in vivo efficacy models were 3.7 mg/kg against P. falciparum and 13 mg/kg against P. berghei. ACT-451840 potently prevented male gamete formation from the gametocyte stage with a 50% inhibition concentration of 6 nM and dose-dependently blocked oocyst development in the mosquito with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 30 nM. The compound's preclinical safety profile is presented and is in line with the published results of the first-in-man study in healthy male participants, in whom ACT-451840 was well tolerated. The fast parasite reduction ratio (PRR) and gametocytocidal effect of ACT-451840 were recently also confirmed in a clinical proof-of-concept (POC) study.

Infectious Diseases
Chair
Speaker
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SEVERE FEVER WITH THROMBOCYTOPENIA SYNDROME IN KOREA: SFTSV AND MIGRATORY BIRD, PERSON-TO-PERSON TRANSMISSION OF SFTSV, AND COINFECTION OF SFTSV AND ORIENTIA TSUTSUGAMISHI
    Time: 11:50-12:20
    Speaker
    Keun Hwa Lee
    Jeju National University
    South Korea
    Biography

    Keun Hwa Lee has been Graduated from Microbiology and Immunology Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea as Ph.D. in 2003 and started working at Department of Microbiology and Immunology Jeju National University School of Medicine, Jeju, South Korea as a professor from 2004 to present. He worked at Channing Lab. BWH, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA between 2005 and 2006 as a research fellow, the Emerging Diseases Surveillance and Response (ESR) Western Pacific World Health Organization (WPRO) as Surveillance officer and International Health Regulation (IHR) duty officer (Volunteer, sabbatical year) in 2014, and US Army Medical Component-Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) in Bangkok, Thailand from 1st Janyary to 6th July as a Visiting Scientist (sabbatical year).

    Abstract

    Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) is tick-borne viral disease such as Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) that was first suspected in China in 2009, the causative virus was reported in 2011, and SFTSV expanded from China to South Korea and Japan in 2012-2013. Most SFTSV infections occur through Haemaphysalis longicornis, which acts as a transmission host between animals and humans. However, it is not known if a genetic connection exists between the viruses in these regions and, if so, how SFTSV is transmitted across China, South Korea, and Japan. We hypothesize that the SFTSV in South Korea share common phylogenetic origins with samples from China and Japan. Further, we postulate that migratory birds, well-known carriers of the tick H. longicornis, are a potential source of SFTSV transmission across countries. Most SFTSV infections occur through H. longicornis. However, SFTSV infection can also occur between family members, and nosocomial transmission of SFTSV is also possible through close contact with a patient. In this study, we first analyzed clinical, epidemiological, and laboratory data for SFTS patients and family members of an index patient in Korea and we suggest that person-to-person transmission of SFTSV among family members is possible in Korea. To determine prevalence of SFTS in South Korea, we examined serum samples from patients with fever and insect bite history in scrub typhus endemic areas. Prevalence of this syndrome among patients suspected of having scrub typhus was high (23.0%, 17/74), suggesting possible co-infection.

  • ASSOCIATION AND MANAGEMENT OF INFLUENZA WITH SEVERE PNEUMONIA/ EMPYEMA IN THE COMMUNITY, HOSPITAL, AND HEALTHCARE-ASSOCIATED SETTING IN JAPAN
    Time: 12:20-12:50
    Speaker
    Masafumi Seki
    Tohoku University
    Japan
    Biography

    Masafumi Seki has been graduated from Department of Medicine, Nagasaki University, as Medical Doctor, with the specialties including Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, and Infection Control. Later on he obtained his post-graduation, started working at Osaka University. Presently he has been working at the Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai City, Japan.

    Abstract

    We will present three cases of influenza-related severe pneumonia/empyema that occurred in one season. Case 1. A 76-year-old diabetic man, developed empyema as a result of severe community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) secondary to Haemophilus influenzae, as confirmed on sputum culture. Case 2. A 55-year-old man with suspected cerebral infarction and diabetes mellitus (DM) developed severe pneumonia/empyema as result of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). Case 3. A 76-year-old woman with heart failure and DM was followed-up on an outpatient basis and was under nursing home care for four months. Subsequently, she developed pneumonia and was admitted to our hospital; influenza antigen was isolated from nasal swab. Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP)/empyema were diagnosed. All three cases had DM, and treated by intravaneous anti-influenza drug: peramivir. In Japan, we have five anti-influenza agents and can choose each agent dependent on influenza and pneumonia severity. Among them, peramivir can be administered by drip infusion, and used not only for the most severe patients, but also for the ambulatory outpatients who have some medical issues. The insurance system supports early administration of them with antibiotics,and as a results, we might be able to have very low influenzarelated mortality. Today, our management style for influenza, including vaccination and infection control team activity, will be introduced.

Young Research Forum, Poster Presentation and E-posters
Speaker
  • Young Research Forum-1
    Everybody in Nigeria is a doctor…': a qualitative study of stakeholder perspectives on lay-diagnosis of malaria and pneumonia in southern Nigeria
    Time: 13:50-14:10
    Speaker
    Kelly Elimian
    University of Nottingham
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Kelly Elimian is a PhD student in the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, UK. He completed his graduation from the Department of Microbiology, University of Benin, Nigeria in 2008. In 2010, he started working in the same department -Microbiology- as a Graduate Assistant, and in the same year started his Master's programme in Medical Microbiology, graduating in 2012. Between 2012 and 2013, following the completion of his Master's programme, he came to the University of Nottingham to study Applied Epidemiology. After a one year break, he returned to Nottingham for his PhD research. His current research focuses on estimating the burden and assessing the accuracy of different diagnostic approaches for malaria and pneumonia in children under the age of five years in Benin City, Nigeria.

    Abstract

    Nigeria bears the highest and second highest burden of malaria and pneumonia respectively in the world. Lay-diagnosis is commonly used by parents for the home management of common childhood illnesses in Nigeria and other countries. Objectives: To explore stakeholder perspectives of lay-diagnosis of malaria and pneumonia and the acceptability and feasibility of training parents in the World Health Organisation Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) guidelines. Design: A qualitative study using individual face-to-face semi-structured interviews. Participants Mothers (n=13) with children under the age of five years presenting to primary healthcare centres (PHCs) for routine medical consultations or immunisation activities and health professionals (HPs) (n=17) involved with the management of primary healthcare system. Setting Benin City, capital of Edo State in southern Nigeria. Results: Parents reported lay-diagnosis was widely practised by themselves and their communities but recognised its limitations. Parents were more confident in managing malaria as compared to pneumonia due to the perceived severity of the latter. They expressed willingness to undertake IMCI training for better diagnosis of common childhood illnesses in their children. However, few parents were reluctant to apply the IMCI skills so acquired to other people’s children concerned that they could be held responsible for an adverse outcome such as admission to critical care or death. In addition, some HPs were concerned that training parents in IMCI could exacerbate the extant problem of misuse of medications. Conclusions: Lay-diagnosis is a widely practised diagnostic approach by parents. There was some evidence of the acceptability of training parents in IMCI for early diagnosis of malaria and pneumonia. This approach could partially address the dearth of healthcare capacity in Nigeria, as well as other developing countries. However, a rigorous evaluation would be required to address feasibility.

  • Young Research Forum-2
    QUANTIFICATION OF COLISTIN PLASMA LEVELS IN CRITICAL PATIENTS FROM SABANA CENTRO, COLOMBIA POPULATION
    Time: 14:10-14:30
    Speaker
    Diana Gonzalez
    Savannah College
    Colombia
    Biography

    Dr. Diana González is medical doctors interested in the evaluation of the relationship between serum levels and therapeutic efficacy in the use of antimicrobial drugs as well as the determination of antimicrobial resistance in the clinical setting related to use of these molecules. Currently is working in the Research Group Therapeutic Evidence of the Faculty of Medicine of the Universidad de La Sabana. In addition, they have participated in speeches and conferences regarding the safe and cost effective use of antimicrobial drugs in Colombia

    Abstract

    Antimicrobial resistance to antibiotic treatment has significantly increased in recent years, causing this to become a public health problem. More than 70% of pathogenic bacteria are resistant to at least one of the currently used antibiotics. Recently, the use of Polymyxin E (Colistin) has been used as a "last line" therapy in treatment of gram-negative multiresistant bacteria. However, pharmacological knowledge about these molecules is very weak, because their use has been discontinued due to their high toxicity. In recent years, research has focused on the determination of the pharmacokinetic parameters of Colistimethate sodium, in order to find the optimal dose to maintain an adequate benefit-risk balance. The aim of this study was to determine Colistin plasma levels in patients infected with multiresistant bacteria, from a Sabana Centro (Colombia) population, by means of the standardization and validation of a fast and simple methodology as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Our results were standardized by HPLC, and allowed to measure plasma levels in the study population. The above, allows to presently guide the dosage of Sodium Colistimethate, according to Colistin plasma levels.

  • Young Research Forum-3
    NUTRITION ASSESSMENT, A QUALITY IMPROVEMENT APPROACH
    Time: 14:30-14:50
    Speaker
    Kibirige Safina
    Mildmay Health Centre
    United Kingdom
    Biography

    Kibirige Nangonde Safina is a 30 year old Ugandan, a counselor at Mild may Uganda. She has a bachelor’s degree in public health and has a working experience of 8 years with HIV and AIDS as a nurse counselor. She started writing abstracts in 2015 and in March 2017 she presented one of her abstracts (the game charger for realizing the 90 90 90 strategy) in the 11th Uganda counseling association conference at hotel African

    Abstract

    Introduction: Nutrition assessment is a vital component in the general care of HIV infected people. With access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV infection may become a chronic, manageable disease. Nutritional and metabolic complications associated with HIV infection like hypertriglyceridemia, low levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and weight loss usually occur. However abnormalities like regional alterations in body shape (fat re-distribution syndrome or HIV-associated lip dystrophy),increasing body weight, high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, insulin resistance, and other metabolic derangements occur if clients are not screened. In addition, as patients are living longer, they may be susceptible to other age-related diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and obesity. This quality improvement project aimed at making sure each HIV client receives nutrition assessment at each visit so as to reduce the burden of disease and promote an enhanced quality of life in HIV-infected individuals. Method: Beginning June 2016 to June 2017 all clinicians at Ndejje Health Centre IV was encouraged to carry out body mass index (BMI) to all clients who visit the clinic. Continued medical education was carried out every month, BMI chats were provided as well as weighing scales and height boards. Random sampling was used each month to retrieve client’s files to find out how many had their BMI done. Results: One in five PLHIVs was found to be under nourished. At the end of June 2017 there was an improvement of nutrition assessment for all clients living positively at Ndejje Health Centre IV from 30% to 89.2%. Conclusion: Nutrition interventions should form an integral part of HIV care programs, understanding the presence of OI, decline in CD4 count, and advancing WHO clinical stages as risk factors can be helpful in preventing under nutrition and over nutrition

  • Young Research Forum-4
    CHARACTERIZATION OF PATIENTS WITH CARBAPENEMASE-PRODUCING PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA ISOLATES IN A MEDIUM LEVEL HOSPITAL IN CHÍA, COLOMBIA
    Time: 14:50-15:10
    Speaker
    Tatiana Pacheco
    Savannah College
    Colombia
    Biography

    Dr Tatiana Pacheco was borned in Convención, Colombia. She received the Medical Doctor degree from National University of Colombia in 2009, since then she has been working in several researches related to the imapact of Infectious diseases in Colombian Population. Now she is attending her master degree in Clinical Pharmacology at University of La Sabana in Bogotá, Colombia where she works with the Therapeutic Evidence research group.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Carbapenemics have been used as one of the most important antimicrobials against severe infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains. The resistance against these antimicrobials presents a complex epidemiology and despite contonous report of clinical and epidemilogical updates in many countries in Latin America and specifically in Colombia, there are few studies. Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics of patients with carbapenemase producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. Material and methods Between January 2015 and April 2017, a descriptive study has been performed. This study included patients from 18 to 82 years old with average age of 52 years. All of them with carbapenemase- producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: It has been documented 37 infected patients; whose 93.1% had a history of antibiotic therapy, the main antibiotic used was Meropenem in 48.64% of the patients treated. Among the reported infections, the most frequent was the urinary tract infection in 29.73% of the patients, followed by soft tissue infection (24.32%), pneumonia and abdominal sepsis in 10.81% of patients, then device-associated infection, surgical site infection, and bacteremia (5.41% each). 72.97% of the patients presented hospitalization in an intensive care unit with an average stay of 19 days. 29.7% of patients received monotherapy, 27.02% had double therapy, in 24.32% of the cases a triple therapy was followed and in the remaining 10.81% there was a regimen of more than three antibiotics. Mortality was 24.32%. Molecular analysis was performed in 3 isolated samples with confirmation of Pseudomona aeruginosa species and presence of carbapenemase type KPC and VIM in the three samples, suggesting the presence of a same clone in the institution.

  • Poster-TMIDPH010
    Vetorial-oral and vetorial transmission of chagas disease in children from amazon region, Brazil – the need for new tools to strength the epidemiological surveillance systems
    Speaker
    Ana Yece das Neves Pinto
    Federal University of Sao Paulo
    Brazil
    Biography

    Ana has a Degree in medicine by Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPa); medical training in infectious and parasitic diseases by UFPa, master's degree in Tropical Medicine. PhD degree in Tropical Medicine - Fundação Oswaldo Cruz Institute, with thesis about autochthonous Acute Chagas disease in the Amazon region, occurred by oral transmission. Public health Assistant researcher of Instituto Evandro Chagas, since 1992, experience with biomedical research applied to health sciences, with emphasis on infectious and parasitic diseases, especially Chagas disease, Malaria, Toxoplasmosis and Leishmaniasis. Main topics: Public Health in the Amazon, Tropical Medicine applied to the health of riverine populations; Chagas disease autochthonous from Amazon rainforest; responses to treatment of patients with Chagas disease; treatment and control of malaria; Parasitic diseases applied Immunology and Vaccinology; Field epidemiology and investigation of outbreaks of febrile and exanthematic syndromes. Research group: Neglected diseases and poverty causation.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Recent environmental changes and failures designed a new epidemiological scenario for some re-emerging infectious disease in Brazil, as example, infections by Trypanosoma cruzi. Frequently described as acute Chagas disease with high morbidity, which is directly assigned to the main form of transmission (oral transmission), but almost invariable involves sylvatic vectors of the parasite with unknown behavior. New epidemiological approaches are necessary to search strategies against this emergent disease that exposes riverian and neglected populations since early ages. Method: Descriptive study applied to surveillance systems to Chagas disease (CD) control in children from riverine areas of Amazon region, Brazil. Results: Children with acute Chagas disease were diagnosed by parasitological and serological tests in Evandro Chagas Institute. Four children with 1 to 8 years-old were treated and had evidences of vectorial-oral transmission. All children had prolonged sick fever and half of them evolved acute myopericarditis with total resolution after treatment. None of the cases was identified during outbreaks. Entomological searches identified sylvatic vectors of T. cruzi (Rhodnius pictipes species) in their house’s periphery. One mother informed us that found her child with an insect squeezed in his mouth two days before the febrile illness. The children were treated and followed for a long time. We didn´t found evidences of evolution to cardiac disease. Conclusion: It is emphasized the necessary accuracy of clinical suspicion and precocious diagnosis of CD in view to eliminate the potential cardiac commitment of children in your adulthood. Insects with an unknown behavior were registered in these cases report. New epidemiological and educational tools to avoid the contact of triatomine vectors of CD and increases food security for people living in forests and riverside of Amazon areas are excellent perspectives to surveillance systems.

  • Poster-TMIDPH011
    RELATIVE BRADYCARDIA IN SCRUB TYPHUS
    Speaker
    Chang Soap Lee
    Chonbuk National University
    South Korea
    Biography

    Chang-Seop Lee, currently working as an assistant professor at Chonbuk National University, Korea. His main research interests are parasitology, neglected tropical diseases, chest medicine and vector Bourne diseases.

    Abstract

    Background: Scrub typhus is a mite-borne infectiousdisease caused by Orientia tsutsugamushi. Arrhythmia is one of the reported cardiac complications and includes non-symptomatic electrocardiographic changes and serious arrhythmias such as ventricular tachycardia and Torsades de pointes. Relative bradycardia is an inappropriately low heart rate response to every 1-degree rise in body temperature that occurs in scrub typhus cases. To investigate the relationship between heart rate and temperature in patients with scrub typhus, we examined 493 febrile patients with documented scrub typhus. Method: Body temperature and heart rate were recorded upon presentation, during treatment, and following symptom resolution. Fever was defined as temperature greater than 37.8°C. Febrile heart rate and temperature data were documented on initial patient evaluation, before application of antibiotic therapy. Baseline temperature and heart rate were assessed when patients first became and then remained afebrile following treatment. Although no uniform definition of relative bradycardia (RB) exists, we defined it a priori as an increase in the heart rate from a baseline of less than 10 beats/minute/°C increase in temperature. Patients exhibiting a pulse increase greater than 10 beats/minute/°C were classified as having non-relative bradycardia (NRB). Results: The general relationship between heart rate and increased temperature was assessed in 493 patients with scrub typhus infection: 337 (68.4%) responded to fever with a heart rate increase <10 beats/minute/°C (RB) and 156 patients had a heart rate response ?10 beats/minute/°C (NRB). Basal temperatures were not significantly different between the two groups. Maximal temperature was significantly higher in the RB than the NRB group. The RB group had a higher median resting heart rate than the NRB group (RB group vs. NRB group, 80.2 ± 11.5 vs. 77.2 ± 10.7 beats/minute; P=0.006). The RB group had a significantly lower heart rate than the NRB group at maximal temperature (RB group vs. NRB group, 84.6 ± 12.5 vs .00.1 ±17.3 beats/minute, P<0.001). ?Heart rate/?temperature showed the opposite effect between the two groups during fever (RB group vs. NRB group, 1.17 ± 8.15 vs. 17.89 ± 8.65, P<0.001). Despite differences in the heart rate response between relative bradycardia and NRB patients, no significant differences were seen in clinical outcomes (acute kidney injury P=0.564, SIRS P=0.523, death P = 0.136) between the two groups. Conclusion: Most patients with scrub typhus present with relative bradycardia. RB in scrub typhus should be included as a biomarker for differential diagnosis from other infectious diseases. In addition, relative bradycardia was not related to clinical outcomes.

  • Poster-TMIDPH012
    EPIDEMIOLOGY OF VISCERAL LEISHMANIASIS IN BARINGO COUNTY, KENYA
    Speaker
    Jane Mbui
    Kenya Medical Research Institute
    Kenya
    Biography

    Jane Mbui graduated from The University of Nairobi, Kenya, as a Medical Doctor, with a bachelor’s degree in Medicine and Surgery M.B.Ch.B. He worked at Mwingi District Hospital, Kitui County, Kenya, as an intern and rotated in Internal Medicine, Paediatrics, Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynaecology for a period of one year. He worked at Mwingi District Hospital, Kitui County, Kenya, as an intern and rotated in Internal Medicine, Paediatrics, Surgery and Obstetrics & Gynaecology for a period of one year. Thereafter, he joined Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) where he has continued his research. Presently he is working at the Kimalel Leishmaniasis Research and Treatment Center located in Baringo County, Kenya as the clinical site investigator.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) or kala-azar is a disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania and transmitted by a bite of infected sandflies of the genus Phlebotomus .VL is fatal if left untreated. The disease is found in the arid and semi-arid regions of Kenya such as Baringo and West Pokot Counties. Methods: A retrospective observational study was conducted during 7 years (2010-2016) at Kimalel Health Centre, in Baringo County. Data from patients treated at the Centre during the 7 years was analyzed for variables such as age, sex, method of diagnosis and seasonal variation. Results: A total of 613 patients were diagnosed with VL and treated between 2010 and 2016. 70% of cases were diagnosed via splenic aspiration while the rest were diagnosed by rK39 rapid antibody test. 55% of all patients were below 14 years old with a predominance of males (76%). Only one case of VL/HIV Co-infection was reported during this period. There was no seasonal pattern for the disease with cases seen throughout the year. Majority of patients (75%) were treated with the combination of Sodium Stibogluconate (SSG) and Paramomycin (PM). Conclusion: These results confirm that VL remains endemic in some parts of Kenya such as Baringo County. The disease mainly affects young children <14 years, and males are predominantly affected with a female to male ratio of 1:3. The most common method of diagnosis at Centre is splenic aspiration, and combination therapy is the mainstay of treatment.

  • Poster-TMIDPH013
    PLASMODIUM BERGHEI ADHERENCE AND ENDOTHELIAL PROTEIN C RECEPTOR EXPRESSION IN EXPERIMENTAL MALARIA-ASSOCIATED ACUTE RESPIRATORY DISTRESS SYNDROME
    Speaker
    Luana dos Santos Ortolan
    Federal University of Sao Paulo
    Brazil
    Biography

    Luana dos Santos Ortolan is a biologist graduated from University Fundação Santo André, São Paulo, Brazil (2009) and has a Master's Degree in Chemical Biology from Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil (2013). She is currently a PhD candidate in Immunology at the Institute of Biomedical Sciences of the University of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Malaria-associated acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) often results in morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, little research has been done on ARDS. Recently, murine models have been used to study malaria-associated ARDS; however, the effect mechanism of adhesion of infected erythrocytes to murine lung endothelial cells remains unknown. The aim of this study was to elucidate the effects and mechanism of infected erythrocytes adhesion to murine lung endothelial cells and aspects of the innate immune response that will bring important contribution to the understanding of malaria-associated ARDS. Methods: DBA/2 mice were infected with 106 infected red blood cells (iRBC) of Plasmodium berghei ANKA (PbA) and classified as ARDS or HP (hyperparasitemia) before death, on the 7th day after infection (dai). Perfused lungs of mice classified as ARDS or HP were collected and the EPCR, ICAM, VCAM and PbA mRNA expression was analyzed by qRT-PCR and lung tissue sections were stained with H&E to analyze the parasite localization or hemozoin concentration by polarized light. DBA/2 mice were also infected with P. berghei ANKA luciferase and analyzed in vivo on the 7th dai to identify the parasite distribution. Primary culture of DBA/2 mice microvascular lung endothelial cells (DBA-PMLEC) were stimulated with IFN- gamma (50ng/ ml), TNF (50ng/ml) and mature forms of iRBC were added for 1 hour and then removed to check the capacity of iRBC to adhere to DBA-PMLEC. In addition, transwells membranes were used containing peritoneal macrophages (M?) or bone marrow’s neutrophils (BMN) and stimulated with iRBC to analyze if soluble factors from these cells affect the capacity of iRBC to adhere in DBA-PMLEC. Dexamethasone was administered to the mice to verify the effect of the antiinflammatory in the experimental model. Stimulated cells were collected to mRNA analyses (ICAM, VCAM, CD36 and EPCR). Results: Microscopy analyses have shown the presence of iRBC in close contact with endothelial cells in lung tissue sections. Higher levels of 18s Plasmodium berghei ANKA mRNA expression and hemozoin were observed in perfused in lungs of ARDS mice compared to HP (qRT-PCR). P. berghei ANKA luciferase is distributed in the peripheral blood and tissue of DBA/2 mice but when mice were perfused, the (luciferase/luciferin) signal was more concentrated in lungs. ICAM-1, VCAM, and EPCR expression is altered in TNF-stimulated cells. IRBC-PbA in contact with M? or BMN increase iRBC-PbA cytoadhesion in (DBA-PMLEC) and M? produce TNF. Dexamethasone-treated mice have lower gene expression of VCAM, EPCR and less TNF in serum (compared to untreated controls) and die with hyperparasitemia symptoms. Conclusion: Our data suggest that P. berghei ANKA infected erythrocytes adhere to DBA-PMLEC and TNF suggested modulating EPCR expression. Financial support: CAPES, CNPq and FAPESP

  • Poster-TMIDPH014
    ORIGIN OF ISLAND VECTORS HELPS TO UNDERSTAND THE TRYPANOSOMA CRUZI CYCLE IN ISLANDS OF CHILE.
    Speaker
    Ricardo Campos Soto
    Pontifical Catholic University of Valparaíso
    Chile
    Biography

    Dr. Rircado Campos Soto has been Graduated from University of Chile as Medical Veterinarian, Later on he obtained his Doctor grade from University of Chile in Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences. He started a postdoctoral position at the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso where he has continued his research until today.

    Abstract

    In Latin America, Chagas disease is one of the most important zoonoses mediated by vectors. The etiological agent is the flagellated protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, transmitted mainly by hematophagous insects of the subfamily Triatominae. T. cruzi alternates between triatomines and several mammalian host species; meantime birds and reptiles are refractory to infection. Triatomines of the Mepraia genus are endemic of Chile and play an important role in T. cruzi transmission in the wild cycle; they are potential vectors for humans. Populations of Mepraia have been reported inhabiting in islands of the north of Chile. In these areas infected T. cruzi specimens have been detected. These insects feed mainly on seabirds and reptiles if birds and reptiles are refractory to infection, what is the origin of the infected T. cruzi vectors in island areas? Suggested hypotheses are: i) The presence of Mepraia in insular areas are explained through passive dispersion by marine birds; ii) The infected Mepraia specimens are originated from ancestral habitats that were separated by vicariance. To clarify the origin of the island vectors, islands and continental specimens were captured and mitochondrial DNA genes were amplified by PCR. Nucleotide sequences were used to estimate phylogeny and dates of divergence between insular and continental populations. Results show both divergent and shared haplotypes between islands and continent. Dates of divergence are consistent with sea level changes during the Pleistocene. Results suggest that both hypotheses are not exclusive and that the origin of island vectors can be explained by dispersion and vicariance. Financing: FONDECYTN°3150289.

  • Poster-TMIDPH017
    A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF FALCIPARUM MALARIA PARASITEMIA IN URBAN AND RURAL AREAS OF KARACHI-PAKISTAN
    Speaker
    Syeda Azra Qamar
    Government College for Women Shahra-e-Liaquakarachi
    Pakistan
    Biography

    Syeda Azra Qamar has completed her PhD from the University of Karachi, Pakistan and partial work of Ph.D. was completed at the University of Arizona, U.S.A. She is currently working as an Associate Professor at the Department of Zoology, from Government College for women shahrah-e-liaquat, Pakistan. She has also accomplished BDV course from Mexico in 2003, first international training course on functional genomics applied to insect vectors of human diseases from Thailand in 2005 and Practical short course on Infectious Disease Modeling from Thailand in 2012 organized by Oxford University. She has actively participated and presented research papers in different international conferences including 1st Geneva forum at Geneva, Switzerland 2006, XI ICOPA at Glasgow, Scotland, 6th European Congress at Verona Italy, XII ICOPA at Melbourne, Australia, 4th conference of the Scandinavian-Baltic Society of Parasitology, Oslo, Norway. 2011, 15 ICID at Bangkok, Thailand, 2012, 5th Congress of European Microbiologists Leipzig, Germany, and has visited twice as a research Scholar at Pasture Institute of Iran, serving as a Reviewer for journal articles and also a Member of South Initiative for Tropical Diseases Research (SSI) from 2003 and Member of advisory board of Annals of tropical medicine and public health from 2009, She has published 10 papers in reputed journal.

    Abstract

    Introduction: Malaria considers as a dangerous and worldwide communicable disease among dengue, tuberculosis, AIDS and HIV and is responsible to 2 million annual deaths especially in African countries. Malaria is caused by sporozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. There are four different species of Plasmodium are known, such as Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale and P. malaria, but in Pakistan two of them (P. falciparum and P.vivax) are common. Falciparum malaria or cerebral malaria is very serious infection among four Plasmodium species because it increases the mortality rates throughout the World. This disease also related with age, sex, immunity, nutritional values, general health and socio-economic condition. The transmission of malaria is follows the bite of infected female Anopheles mosquito; the sporozoites transfer from the salivary glands of the infected mosquito and enter into the blood circulation of host and invade its hepatocytes, after asexual multiplication convert into thousand of merozoites that invade the erythrocytes and after repeat multiplication it gives schizont, some differentiate into sexual forms of male and female gametocytes that taken up by female Anopheles mosquitoes during blood meal, inside the mid-gut, the male gametocytes shows rapid division, produces 8 flagellated micro-gametes which fertilize the female macrogamete, resultant into ookinate goes to gut wall after en-cystment become oocyst which ruptures to release thousand of sporozoites that reaches to salivary glands of mosquitoes. In Pakistan Malaria belongs to the oriental eco-epidemiological type. Epidemics have occurred at 6 to 10 year’s interval; about 40% of the cases were of P. falciparum in 1972-73 more common in Sindh province (64%). The main vector involved was A.culicifacies and A.stephensi, both developed resistances to an organophosphate. According to the malaria review mission report of 1998, malaria, especially caused by P. falciparum is on the increase in Pakistan. Study Area: This study was conducted at different urban and adjacent rural areas of Karachi.from January 2003 to December 2004. Karachi is the largest city and the capital of province Sindh, known as main seaport and the financial centre of Pakistan, its estimated population is 13 to 15 million, it is one of the largest cities in term of population and recognized to be 10th largest urban agglomeration in the world. Method: Thick and thin blood smears were examined and the thin blood smears were fixed in 100% methanol and stained in 2% Giemsa. Different stages P. falciparum were investigated under the oil immersion as well as the number of parasites/200 white blood cells (WBCs) was counted and the density of parasites per micro liter of blood was also calculated. Result: Out of 2671patients from urban and 1558 from adjacent Goths including male and female of different age groups visiting different hospital, clinics and medical camps having symptoms of fever, chill, abdominal pain, vomiting and headache were examined by peripheral blood smear for the diagnoses of different species of malarial parasite (MP).The blood smear only positive for P. falciparum were included in the study while, mixed infection of P. vivax were excluded from the study. Total number of infection, positive for P. falciparum was 353(13.21%) including (7.33% male 5.87% female) & 97(6.22%) including (4.42% male 1.79% female) from urban and rural areas respectively.

  • E-poster 1
    A CASE REPORT OF ECHINOSTOMA SPECIES FOR THE FIRST TIME IN NEPAL
    Speaker
    Ranjit Shah
    Tribhuvan University, Nepal
    Nepal
    Biography

    Ranjit Sah is a Resident at Institute of Medicine of Tribhuvan University Teaching Hospital, Nepal. He has been undergoing researches regarding various clinical cases during his study period. He has done research on differentiation of Taenia species by simple ZN stain and the article was published in JIOM with title “Identification of Taenia in a 6 year old child”. He has identified for the first time cases in Nepal like Acanthamoeba in corneal scraping of a patient with keratitis and Toxoxoplasma parasite (tachyzoite and bradyzoites) demonstrated in vitreous fluid etc

    Abstract

    Introduction: Echinostomiasis is an infection caused by trematodes belonging to the genus Echinostoma. It can infect both humans and animals. These intestinal flukes have a three-host life cycle with snails or aquatic organisms as intermediate host and humans and other animals as definitive host. They infect the gastrointestinal tract of humans. With light infection, patient may be asymptomatic. With heavy infections, the worms can produce catarrhal inflammation and mild ulceration and the patient may experience diarrhea and abdominal pain. Infection occurs on consumption of raw or undercooked (roasted) mollusks and fish.We are reporting a case of a 62 years male from Gorkha, Nepal who presented to TUTH on July 10, 2015 with the chief complain upper abdominal pain and distension, vomiting on and off for 3 to 4 months. He has history of consumption of alcohol, roasted fish and snail and have had jaundice 3 times in the past, the recent episode of jaundice being 3 to 4 months back. Considering his symptoms of abdominal pain and jaundice, he underwent endoscopy. On endoscopy, an adult flat worm was seen in the intestine which was sent to microbiology laboratory for further evaluation. Method: The adult worm was received in our laboratory and its morphological characteristics were studied. Since, the worms was small it was pressed between two slides to study its morphological characteristics. Three consecutive stool samples were collected and processed for routine macroscopic and microscopic examination. The size of the detected ova was measured using cell sensation software version 1.12 for DP73 camera installed to the Olympus BX53 microscope used for the microscopy. Result: The adult worm was flat leaf like, grayish in colour measuring approximately 1 cm in length by 2 mm in breadth. Microscopic examination of the wet mount of stool sample revealed ellipsoidal, yellow-brown, eggs with somewhat inconspicuous operculum measuring approximately 130 by 70 micrometer . On the basis of morphological appearance of adult worm and characteristic feature of the detected ova and its measurement, Echinostoma species was identified. The photographic evidence of worm and eggs with the results of measurement were then forwarded to CDC (Centre for Disease Control and Prevention) which was later confirmed to be that of Echinostoma species by CDC, Atlanta. Patient was treated with praziquantel 40mg/kg (single dose), the drug of choice for Echinostoma infection and stool examination after 2 weeks did not show any ova of Echinostoma.

  • E-poster-2
    PREVALENCE OF NOROVIRUS AND ROTAVIRUS IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE GASTROENTERITIS
    Speaker
    Majalinda Kota
    Albania's Public Health Institute
    Albania
    Biography

    Dr. Majlinda KOTA (DHIMOLEA) has been Graduated from University of Tirana, Faculty of Natural Science in 1990 as Biologist. Later on he obtained his Master`s Degree in 2002 and PhD in 2007 from Faculty of Natural Science with subjects in Virology. She is a viorologist who works in the National Laboratory of Virology and with a university research group. Her research interests are enteroviruses, polioviruses of haemorraghic fever, Herpes viruses and Influenza viruses. Among her achievements are the contribution to polio elimination and maintenance of polio free status in Albania and also the estimation of burden of rotavirus associated gastroenteriritis which still is. Presently he has been working at the Faculty of Naural Science as the lecturer.

    Abstract

    Gastroenteritis is one of the most common diseases affecting children and rotavirus is the major etiological agent worldwide. Noroviruses are second only to rotaviruses as causative agents of acute gastroenteritis in children. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and clinical features of associated gastroenteritis among hospitalized children. Overall 326 stool samples were collected from hospitalized pediatric patients with a diagnosis of acute gastroenteritis. We analyzed clinical features, hospitalization course of the patients and laboratory data. Samples were tested by ELISA antigen test for Rotavirus and Real_time PCR for Norovirus. Patients with bloody or bacterial diarrhea were excluded from the study. Norovirus was the second most frequent pathogen after rotavirus, being detected in 13.8 % of the 326 enrolled children and in 10.3% of them as a single causative agent. Rotavirus was detected in 28.5% of children. Norovirus and Rotavirus infection was more prevalent in children less than 2 years of age. Vomiting and fever was present in 58% of cases. Norovirus cases were clinically indistinguishable from those of rotavirus origin. Norovirus was a frequent cause of acute sporadic gastroenteritis requiring hospitalization in Albanian children less than 5 years of age and it represents the second most common etiologic agent after rotavirus.

  • E-poster-3
    PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF Toxoplasma gondii IN HIV/AIDS PATIENTS; A CURRENT SITUATION IN ALBANIA
    Speaker
    Erjona Abazaj
    Albania's Public Health Institute
    Albania
    Biography

    Erjona Abazaj is currently working as a Biologist/Parasitologist in the Laboratory of Parasitology, Institute of Public Health (IPH), Tirana, Albania where he has continued his research. Dr. ABAZAJ Erjona has been Graduated from 2002 as Biologist, with Diploma in Microbiology from the University of Tirana, Faculty of Natural Science, Tirana, Albania. Later in 2005 she has completed her Master`s Degree from the same faculty with subjects with gastrointestianl diseases and in 2009 she has completed her PhD with research focus centered on the recognition of Toxoplasma gondii in the Albania population by using immunological and molecular methods. Presently she is working at the at the University of Medicine in Tirana, Albania as the lecturer.

    Abstract

    Toxoplasma gondii is a single-celled parasite that causes the disease known as toxoplasmosis. In immunosuppressed (AIDS) patients, this infection can develop into fatal toxoplasmic encephalitis (TE) in. The study aim was to evaluate the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis and also to identify risk factors associated with Toxo-seropositive in immunosuppressed patients. A prospective human serosurvey for toxoplasmosis was conducted at the HIV clinic in the University Hospital Center “Mother Theresa” from March 2010 to January 2017. Patients enrolled in the antiretroviral (ARV) treatment programme were invited to participate. Patient`s sera were analysed for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies by NovaLisa Toxoplasma gondii ELISA (from NovaTec, Germany). Results were analyzed with the aid of the software SPSS 20.0. Confidence interval (CI) 95% and adjusted odd ratio (OR) were calculated. The prevalence of infection with T. Gondii varies from 3.93% for recently aquired infection (anti-Toxo IgM) to 43.3% for past infection (anti-Toxo IgG). The average age was 39.38?±?24.4 years with min 18 to maximum 72 years old. Multivariate analysis showed that gender difference (OR = 3.579, 95% CI [1.58 to 8.04] p value =0.0021) and presence of cats in their house (OR = 6.11, 95% CI [2.70 to 13.80] p value < 0.0001) were the only factors associated with Toxoplasma gondii infection with). The seropsitivity of these infection HIV-infected patients were very higher and could be at high risk of developing clinical evidence of severe toxoplasmosis. So, the screening of this community it is necessary to introduce primary behavioral practices to prevent Toxoplasma infection among HIV-infected patients.

Previous Conferences

Mail us at

General Enquiries
tropicalmedicine@alliedconferences.org
Want to Sponsor/Exhibit/ Advertise with us!
tropicalmedicine@alliedconferences.org
Accommodation
tropicalmedicine@alliedconference.com
More details about sponsorship:sponsors@alliedacademies.com

Terms and Conditions

Cancellation, Postponement and Transfer of Registration

If Allied Academies cancels this event for any reason, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another Allied Academies event which must occur within one year from the date of cancellation.

If Allied Academies postpones an event for any reason and you are unable or unwilling to attend on one of the rescheduled dates, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another Allied Academies event which must occur within one year from the date of postponement.

Allied Academies is not responsible for any loss or damage as a result of substitution, alteration or cancellation/postponement of an event. In the unlikely event of cancellation or postponement of the conference due to circumstances beyond Allied Academies reasonable control including but not limited to, acts of terrorism, war, and natural disaster, Allied Academies cannot be held responsible for any cost, damage or expense which may be incurred by registrants as a consequence of the event being postponed or cancelled. Due to any unavoidable circumstances if there is a change in venue of the conference, all the registered participants will be intimated immediately regarding the change.

All fully paid registrations are transferable to other persons from the same organization, if registered person is unable to attend the event. Transfers must be made by the registered person in writing to is tropicalmedicine@alliedconferences.org

Details must include the full name of replacement person, their title, contact phone number and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified.

If the registrant is unable to attend, and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

Within 90-60 days of the conference: 50% refund
Within 60 days of the conference: No refund

Highlights from last year's Convention

Copyright © 2018-2019 Allied Academies, All Rights Reserved.