Scientific Program

Day 1

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Biochemical production of aviation biofuels or bio-jet precursors from lignocellulosic biomass materials

    Washington State University
    USA
    Abstract

    Despite continuous improvements in the efficiency of the jet engine, the world consumption of jet fuel is constantly growing ca. 5% a year and is expected to reach a total of 385 million tons in 2035 up from 243 mill tons today. Even the most positive outlook for crude oil production is still a pessimistic scenario for the aviation industry. Jet fuel is a specific mid-range distillate and this fraction is only accounting for 4-5% of the initial crude oil. To meet the aviation industries need for fuels in the future along with their targets for reducing the carbon footprint, solutions for large-scale production of aviation biofuels is in focus right now. In the presentation, I will discuss some current solution for producing aviation biofuels such as the Alcohol to Jet pathway of producing cellulosic ethanol, butanol and propanol by fermentation of cellulosic sugars followed by catalytic upgrading to bio-jet. While different mutant of yeast is the main biocatalyst for the alcohol production, I will further show some new pathways from our laboratory based on homo-lactic acid fermentation with Bacillus strains as well as mixed acids production with microbial consortia. Finally, I will show results on direct fermentation of biomass sugars to jet fuels components using mutant of Aspergillus carbonarius engineered with genes from blue-green bacteria.

  • Fermented canola and seaweed feed and food products – Prebiotics, Probiotics and Bioactives

    Fermbiotics
    Denmark
    Abstract

    FermBiotics and Fermentationexperts have developed several fermented plant and seaweed products for pigs, poultry and human health. The products consist of prebiotics, probiotics and bioactives from the fermented plant and seaweed material. We have demonstrated very good in vitro anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory activities of the fermented material. A pig trial shows that fermented feed called EP100i containing fermented canola can replace zinc oxide in pig’s feed. The European Commission (EC) has voted in favour of a ban on the veterinary use of zinc oxide in feed. An additional pig trial showed a high (58%) reduction of LDL-cholesterol in pigs given 4 % EP100i feed compared with normal feed. We have demonstrated positive gut microbiome modulation in several animal models. FermBiotics will in collaboration with Silkeborg Hospital, Denmark in the EU project Macro Cascade run a randomized double-blinded matched cross trial using a dose of 5 g fermented canola and seaweed material. The clinical trial will be performed in N=80 human patients with mild-moderate state of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) and/or Spondyloarthropathy (SPA) including both gender.

  • A new era of biocatalysis and biotransformation: Tailor-making biocatalyst towards bioproducts

    East China University of Science and Technology
    China
    Abstract

    Manufacturing of bioproducts, such as pharmaceutics, food and cosmetic additives, chemicals etc., has stepped into a new era, where cell factory or molecular machine will play more and more important role for meeting the requirements of mankind. In the recent years, tailor-design has been paid much attention in the area of biosynthesis and biotransformation since it will deeply influence the bioprocess. By means of combination of the advanced methods and techniques coming from different discipline, such as bioinformatics, computational biology, molecular biology, enzyme engineering, biocatalysis, synthetic biology and so on, a novel enzyme could be created, an existing enzyme could be redesigned and reconstructed, even a microorganism could be reedited and reassembled towards the expected valuable compound. In this presentation, some established cases will be shared and analyzed.

Industrial Biotechnology | Green Chemicals | Synthetic Biology | Industrial Enzymes
Chair
Speaker
  • Fermented insect pheromones for environmentally friendly pest control
    Speaker
    Irina Borodina
    Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability
    Denmark
    Biography

    Irina Borodina is Senior Scientist and Group Leader at the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability, Technical University of Denmark (DTU). She is also co-founder and CEO of BioPhero ApS. Her research focuses on advancing the methodologies for metabolic engineering of cell factories for the sustainable production of bulk and high-value chemicals. She received PhD degree in Biotechnology from DTU. She has authored 37 peer-reviewed articles, which have been cited over 1,600 times, and she is co-inventor of 9 patent applications.

    Abstract

    Sex pheromones, which are produced naturally by insects for mating communication, present an environmentally safe alternative to insecticides for pest control. Whereas insecticides have severe negative effects on public health and the environment, pheromones are biodegradable species-specific compounds that neither affect beneficial species in the ecosystem, nor exert adverse effects on human health. Pheromones are currently produced by chemical synthesis, which requires expensive and often hazardous specialty chemicals as starting materials and usually results in toxic waste as by-products. We developed a biotechnology-based solution to enable cheaper and environmentally friendly production of pheromone components from renewable feedstocks using yeast cell factories. This required reconstruction of synthetic biochemical pathways towards pheromones in yeast, extensive engineering of the yeast host to improve the flux towards the products, and optimization of fermentation processes. This technology paves the way for safer pest control in agriculture.

  • Investigations of enzymatic transesterification of castor oil for biodiesel production
    Speaker
    Christensen K V
    University of Southern Denmark
    Denmark
    Biography

    Christensen K V holds a PhD from DTU, Denmark. He is associate professor at University of Southern Denmark and is the head of section of Chemical Engineering. He has over 30 publications with a total number of citations above 1000, and a publication H-index of 12 (SCOPUS). During his academic career at Odense University College (Denmark), American University of Sharjah (AUE) and University of Southern Denmark, he has supervised and co-supervised several PhD-students, over 90 Master and Bachelor students in their thesis work and has further partaken in over 10 externally funded projects within biofuel and value-added production from biomass and bio-waste.

    Abstract

    The search for renewable biofuels to replace fossil fuels makes biodiesel production a fairly strait forward choice, both from a production and application point of view, in as much as the processing technology is readily available and only minor changes to the existing fuel distribution network and diesel engines are needed. Unfortunately, at present most biodiesel is produced by transesterification of edible vegetable oils produced on lands useful for producing crops for feed and fodder. This makes biodiesel production less attractive from a resource and sustainability point of view. There are crops available that do grow in arid soils not normally attractive for production of food or fodder. One such crop is castor beans. The oil produced from castor beans, castor oil, is not suitable for human consumption but can be used as a starting point for polymer production, as lubricant, and, if mixed with other fatty methyl or ethyl esters, after transesterification for biodiesel.The work presented gives an overview of the results obtained from transesterification of castor oils using the non-immobilized enzymes Eversa Transform and Resinase HT, the immobilized enzyme Novozyme 435, combining kinetic studies and enzyme reuse with process simulation.

  • Glycolipid production in yeast and enzyme catalysed processes
    Speaker
    Lars Haastrup Pedersen
    Aalborg University
    Denmark
    Biography

    Lars Haastrup Pedersen did his industrial PhD in a collaboration between Carlsberg Research Center and Copenhagen University, Denmark. He has been working 25 years at Aalborg University where he is associate professor in the Bioprocess Technology Group. Current publication record shows a total of 56 including 25 scientific articles with over 400 citations, H-index Web of Science Thomas Reuters: 12

    Abstract

    Only about 25% of the total surfactant production is biobased and can be classified according to the method of production: 1) Synthetic biobased surfactants synthesised from sugars and fatty acids or their corresponding alcohols by conventional organic chemistry at elevated temperature and reduced pressure using chemical catalysts, 2) Enzymatic biosurfactants also synthesised from sugars and fatty acids but at relatively lower temperatures and atmospheric pressure in cell free processes utilizing the substrate specificity and regio-selectivity of enzymes, 3) Microbial biosurfactants are glycolipids incorporated into cell membranes or secreted extracellularly by microorganisms. Microbial biosurfactants are still in their commercial infancy with only very few products on the market. The most promising biosurfactants known today are produced in bioreactors on lipid- and sugar-containing growth media and include sophoro-, rhamno-, trehalose and mannosylerythritol lipids. The presentation will discuss resent results on production of glycolipids in yeast and enzyme catalysed processes

  • GreenLab Denmark – an unique development platform and site for Industrial Biotechnology and Bioprocessing
    Speaker
    Christopher Sorensen
    GreenLab Denmark
    Denmark
    Biography

    Christopher Sorensen, originally from New York, has worked at the forefront of technology and commercial innovation for over 30 years on three continents. The last 15 years have been focused on creating positive social impact through integrating technology and business innovation at scale. Most recently,he supported development of a new global clean-tech cluster at Masdar City, including the Masdar Institute in Abu Dhabi. He is now applying his experience to building the green industrial platform GreenLab Denmark. The project is now under construction and is enabled by at multilateral group including global energy conglomerates, new niche developers, recognized R&D leaders as well as all levels of Danish government institutions.

    Abstract

    Many proven bioprocesses suffer at the point of scale up and commercialization due to interwoven technical, economic and market challenges. This retards the progress of promising new processes and technologies. The GreenLab consortium is building a unique energy exchange platform, which optimizes green energy generation and storage, to reduce the cost of production for many biologically based industrial processes. Part of the consortium effort is focused in input streams and off-takers to ensure commercial success. The result is an accelerated uptake of new processes by industrial partners and increased incentive for re-investment in R&D. The GreenLab platform and the consortium behind it will be presented. An exploration of the opportunities which arise from the symbiotic energy exchange and the expanded green footprint of the resulting products will be discussed.

Day 2

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS
  • Marine Biotechnology – drivers for the aquaculture industry

    Flinders University
    Australia
    Abstract

    The world population is predicted to expand from 7 to ~9 billion people by 2050 which is likely to result in significant increased demands for food (70%), fuel (50%) and fresh water (30%). Feeding the growing world population will require increases in agricultural crop productivities as arable land resources are limited and continued urbanization and industrialization has led to declines in Australia’s farmland over the last four decades, following world trends. Increasing crop productivities is further challenged by predicted freshwater resource scarcity and greenhouse gas (GHG)-induced climate instability, i.e. the increase and/or severity of ‘freak’ weather events, such as storms, prolonged droughts etc.. Maintaining and increasing Australian crop productivities will inevitably require, fertilisation, the production of which was estimated to contribute 1.2% of the total GHG emissions due to energy requirements. Algae are heralded as the potential saviors of the world’s ailments due to photosynthetic cultivation on non-arable land using non-potable water (saline, brackish, industrial waste waters). Algal cultivation remediates CO2 GHG pollution (1.83 t CO2 per t biomass dry weight) and nutrient- or metal-rich waste waters. Among the various algal products that can be derived from the biomass, fertilizer production is an immediate and readily implementable product pathway offering potential for regional agricultural communities to become self-sufficient and independent of costly imports. This key-note will compare productivities of traditional and novel cultivation and processing pathways highlighting where biotechnological production processes can improve traditional aquaculture and generate new market opportunities for expansion of aquaculture into hitherto non-traditional aquaculture markets.

  • The green biorefiney protein value chain - economic issues and possibiities

    University of Copenhagen
    Denmark
    Abstract

    Morten Gylling is senior research advisor at the department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen where he is leading the bioeconomy group at the department. He is active in EIT Climate-KIC as well as the Danish innovation network INBIOM. He has a long experience in techno-economic analysis of agricultural and agro-industrial production systems and value chains. He has been and is coordinating large multidisciplinary projects involving agriculture, science and industry, both national and international within the areas of bioeconomy and sustainability. Most recently he has been coordinator of the Danish +10 million tonnes plan project and is currently participating in the Biovalue SPIR project coordinating the platform of economic, environmental and ethical analysis as well as participating in a number of other biotechnology and bioeconomy innovation projects. He is also doing scientific based advice to the Ministry of environment, agriculture and fisheries on topics like NBT and GMO regulation and sustainable soy and palm oil value chains.

  • Conversion and integration of hemicellulose in the bioeconomy

    Technical University of Denmark
    Denmark
    Abstract

    The conversion of hemicellulose, which is the second most abundant component of lignocellulosic biomass after glucose, has been considered very important for the development of a bioeconomy since this fraction is usually found in high amount in biomass composition (up to 40% w/w) and offers new opportunities for the production of fuels and chemicals. However, efforts are still needed for an efficient conversion of sugars from hemicellulosic hydrolysates since xylose, its main building block sugar, cannot be efficiently utilized by many microorganisms. In addition, hemicellulose sugars are usually recovered in a medium containing a mixture of other components, among which, several are toxic to the microorganisms. In this sense, studies have been focused on the development of pretreatment strategies able to result in less toxic hydrolysate media more suitable for use in bioconversion processes, as well as on the development of more robust microbial strains able to tolerate the toxicity of hemicellulosic hydrolysates. For industrial implementation and incorporation in biorefineries, determining the amount of sugars that can be used for the production of fuels or chemicals is also fundamental to develop cost-competitive processes using lignocellulosic biomass as a feedstock. All these points will be presented and discussed in this presentation.

Current research focus in Industrial Biotechnology | Agro Biotechnology | Biofuels and Biorefinery | Industrial Microbes
Chair
Speaker
  • Functional metagenomic mining and comprehensive pathway optimization using synthetic selections
    Speaker
    Hans J Genee
    Biosyntia ApS
    Denmark
    Biography

    Hans J Genee is the Founder of Biosyntia ApS. He founded the Biotech Academy Camp, and his activities in synthetic biology has led to peer reviewed publications, the McKinsey Award for exceptional achievements, the SBR-DTU prize for Most Innovative Project, and the Novo Scholarship. He is a Ph.Dc in Biotechnology at the NNF Center for Biosustainability and holds an M.Sc.Eng. degree with honors in Systems Biology from the Technical University of Denmark, Delft University of Technology, and Harvard University.

    Abstract

    By solving complex metabolic engineering challenges, Biosyntia, a Copenhagen-based biotech company, delivers biological manufacturing of ingredients and high value chemicals. In this talk, co-founder and CSO, Hans Genee, explains how the company with co-workers deploy synthetic selection systems to enable high-throughput mining and functional validation of biological functions. We present a synthetic selection system for thiamine, a vitamin of crucial interest for industrial biotechnology and human health. Using this system we mined soil and gut metagenomes for thiamine transporters and identified several members of a novel transporter class. Additionally, to probe the sequence-function landscape of the complex and tightly regulated thiamine biosynthesis pathway of Escherichia coli, and to speed up the engineering of optimized strains, we applied the synthetic selection to interrogate 16,384 refactored pathway variants that sample the synthetic design space. This approach enabled rapid identification of new and non-intuitive pathway configurations leading to high thiamine production levels. Combined, our results demonstrate how synthetic biology approaches can effectively be deployed to functionally mine metagenomes and elucidate sequence-function relationships of complex transport and biosynthesis systems in bacteria.

  • Super resolution localization and live-tracking analyzed by pair correlation and a novel power-spectral method reveal short-term cAMP regulation of the water channel aquaporin-3
    Speaker
    Eva Arnspang Christensen
    University of Southern Denmark
    Denmark
    Biography

    Eva Arnspang Christensen is the associate professor and head of the team in molecular biofotonics at the department of Chemical Engineering, Biotechnology and Environmental Technology and a young researcher. She has already shown remarkable results in research by using super-resolution photomedicated microscopy techniques to visualize how proteins are organized in both living and fixed cell membranes. She is active in the measurement of membrane protein diffusion coefficients, which is the most direct tool to see if changes in membrane lipid compositions result in altered diffusion of proteins. She has published five articles on diffusion with k-Space Image Correlation Spectroscopy (kICS) applied to membrane proteins and lipids, including a method paper in collaboration with researchers at McGill University, Montreal Canada.

    Abstract

    Single particle localization and live tracking in cells are essential to reveal nanoscale regulation of proteins. The water channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is important for the renal ability to concentrate urine but little is known regarding plasma membrane regulation of AQP3 in response to short-term hormone mediated urine concentration facilitated by increased levels of cAMP. Super resolution Photoactivatable Localization Microscopy (PALM) with quantitative Pair Correlation analysis (PC-PALM) revealed cAMP mediated nanoscale clustering of AQP3 in the plasma membrane upon cAMP stimulation. Novel power spectral analysis of live-PALM image sequences of tracks lasting 5 frames revealed that while the measured diffusion coefficients of AQP3 were identical between control and cAMP stimulated cells, the confinement radius increased significantly for long trajectories, in qualitative agreement with the results from PC-PALM analysis. Thus fixed and live PALM measurements revealed a change in AQP3 plasma membrane nano-organization upon cAMP stimulation, indicating short-term hormone regulation of AQP3 at the nanoscale level. This regulation of nano-organization may play an important physiological function in regulation of urine concentration and body water homeostasis.

  • Towards label-free characterization of constituent biopolymers of lignocellulosic biomass using Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Scattering
    Speaker
    Simon Vilms Pedersen
    University of Southern Denmark
    Denmark
    Biography

    Simon Vilms Pedersen is a 3rd year PhD-student at the University of Southern Denmark, DK. His research is centered around understanding the role of surface chemistry and surface physics of lignocellulosic biomasses on enzymatic hydrolysis. In March 2018 he received the EliteForsk-travel stipend from the Danish Ministry of Higher Education and Science.

    Abstract

    Biomass characterization, in terms of surface topography and chemical composition of constituent biopolymers is of significant importance, both in industry and in research. Characterization at micron- and nano-scale is frequently done using microscopy techniques, including Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Confocal Fluorescence Microscopy and more recently, super-resolution fluorescence imaging has also been applied. A drawback of the canonical fluorescence microscopy techniques is that successful imaging and identification of constituent biopolymers in complex substrates is highly dependent on auto-fluorescing fluorophores, or specificity and efficiency of selected dyes and exogenously introduced fluorescent labels. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Microscopy is a third order optical process, which can be used to probe molecular vibrations inherent to the constituent biopolymers of the substrate, enabling chemically specific imaging. CARS is a multiphoton technique generating signals that are stronger than typical spontaneous Raman scattering, enabling video-rate data acquisition and optical sectioning. The purpose of this work was to conduct label-free imaging of rapeseed straw (B. napus), using Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) Microscopy, and characterize signal contributions from cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose present in the biomass. By spectral unmixing of the hyperspectral dataset collected, we aimed at extracting endmember spectras correlating to those of the major chemical constituents, cellulose, lignin and hemicellulose. This is a work in progress.

  • Hydrodynamic cavitation as a new approach for sugarcane bagasse pretreatment
    Speaker
    Júlio César dos Santos
    Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP)
    Brazil
    Biography

    Júlio César dos Santos has completed his PhD in 2005 at Faculty of Chemical Engineering of Lorena (FAENQUIL), São Paulo, Brazil. He is a professor in Engineering School of Lorena/University of São Paulo and has over 70 publications that have been cited about 1000 times. His publication H-index is 19 (ResearcherID: H-4777-2013) and his main topics of interest are linked to biotechnology, as: biorefineries, biofuels, bioreactors, enzymes and process simulation.

    Abstract

    Hydrodynamic cavitation (HC) is a technology that has received attention due to different possibilities for its application in industrial processes. Last years, new applications have been developed, including the use of HC to assist process steps in biorefineries for production of biofuels and other interesting compounds. A fundamental step required to use lignocellulosic biomass as raw material in biorefineries corresponds to a pretreatment necessary to increase the material digestibility aiming to favor a subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis of its carbohydrate fractions. Actually, in despite of many studies performed about a number of different pretreatment methods last decades, this step remains as a persistent bottleneck for the viability of lignocellulosic biorefineries. In this way, the evaluation of new technologies is desirable and, as alternative, HC-assisted pretreatment was recently reported and interesting results have been obtained. In our work, different strategies have been studied for HC-assisted alkaline pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse, an important low cost feedstock largely available in countries as Brazil. Among the devices that can generate HC, orifice plates were chosen and different variables have been studied to modify the material structure and composition during pretreatment, resulting in higher enzymatic digestibility of cellulose present in the bagasse. The use of controlled temperature (60-70°C) was observed as an important variable in the process, besides the inlet pressure (about 3 bar), NaOH concentration (about 0.3 M) and use of an auxiliary oxidant as H2O2 (about 0.7-0.8% v/v). Optimization of these variables has resulted in a material with low lignin content and high enzymatic digestibility (cellulose hydrolysis yield higher than 90%) using a pretreatment time of 10-20 min. Thus, considering the results obtained until now, HC-assisted pretreatment process was shown as a promising technology with potential to contribute to overcome one of the main bottlenecks for lignocellulosic biorefineries.

Mail us at

Program Enquiry
industrialbiotech@alliedconference.org
Sponsorship/Exhibitor
sponsoraac@alliedacademies.com
General Enquiry
industrialbiotech@alliedconferences.org
More details about sponsorship:sponsors@alliedacademies.com

Terms and Conditions

Cancellation, Postponement and Transfer of Registration

All cancellations or modifications of registration must be made in writing to industrialbiotech@alliedconference.org

Cancellation Policy

If  Allied Academies cancels this event for any reason, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another Allied Academies event which must occur within one year from the date of cancellation.

Postponement

If Allied Academies Ltd postpones an event for any reason and you are unable or unwilling to attend on rescheduled dates, you will receive a credit for 100% of the registration fee paid. You may use this credit for another Allied Academies event which must occur within one year from the date of postponement.

Transfer of registration

All fully paid registrations are transferable to other persons from the same organization, if registered person is unable to attend the event. Transfers must be made by the registered person in writin industrialbiotech@alliedconference.org. Details must be included the full name of replacement person, their title, contact phone number and email address. All other registration details will be assigned to the new person unless otherwise specified.

Registration can be transferred to one conference to another conference of Allied Academies if the person is unable to attend one of conferences.

However, Registration cannot be transferred if it is intimated within 14 days of respective conference.
The transferred registrations will not be eligible for Refund.

Visa Information

Keeping in view of increased security measures, we would like to request all the participants to apply for Visa as soon as possible.

Allied Academies will not directly contact embassies and consulates on behalf of visa applicants. All delegates or invitees should apply for Business Visa only.

Important note for failed visa applications: Visa issues cannot come under the consideration of cancellation policy of Allied Academies, including the inability to obtain a visa.

Refund Policy:

If the registrant is unable to attend, and is not in a position to transfer his/her participation to another person or event, then the following refund arrangements apply:

Keeping in view of advance payments towards Venue, Printing, Shipping, Hotels and other overheads, we had to keep Refund Policy is as following slabs-
  • Before 60 days of the conference: Eligible for Full Refund less $150 service Fee
  • Within 60-46 days of Conference: Eligible for 40% of payment Refund
  • Within 45 days of Conference: Not eligible for Refund

Accommodation Cancellation Policy:

Accommodation Providers (Hotels) have their own cancellation policies, and they generally apply when cancellations are made less than 30 days prior to arrival. Please contact us as soon as possible, if you wish to cancel or amend your accommodation. Allied Academies Ltd will advise the cancellation policy of your accommodation provider, prior to cancelling or amending your booking, to ensure you are fully aware of any non-refundable deposits.

Authorization Policy


Copyright © 2019-2020 Allied Academies, All Rights Reserved.